Confederate Incognito: The Civil War Reports of "Long Grabs," a.k.a. Murdoch John McSween, 26th and 35th North Carolina Infantry

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McFarland, Nov 26, 2012 - History - 271 pages
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Preferring anonymity, Murdoch John McSween wrote over 80 letters under the pseudonym "Long Grabs" to the Fayetteville Observer (North Carolina), serving as their unofficial war correspondent. For the first two full years of the war, 1862-1863, he was a sometimes drill master at Camp Mangum, in Raleigh, and a wanderer among the regiments in North Carolina and Virginia. What he wrote was varied--the fighting in eastern North Carolina and at Fredericksburg and Petersburg in Virginia, the conditions of the soldiers, the hardships of the civilians, the history of places he visited, and biographical sketches such as that of Jefferson Davis. In 1863, based on certain promises made by Colonel Matt Ransom, McSween joined the 35th Regiment. A bitter dispute soon developed over those promises with the result that McSween was court-martialed and sentenced to twelve months at hard labor. Released, he joins the 26th Regiment and is twice wounded at the Battle of Petersburg. After the war, he returns to Fayetteville where he edits and publishes The Eagle newspaper.
 

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Contents

Preface and Acknowledgments
1
Introduction
5
1 North Carolina Goes to War
17
April 10 1862June 26 1862
25
August 1 1862October 29 1962
49
October 31 1862March 12 1863
63
March 12 1863June 1 1863
110
June 9 1863July 1 1863
162
The Final Year July 12 1864February 22 1865
210
Reconstruction Years
231
Chapter Notes
237
Bibliography
255
Index
259
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Editor E.B. Munson works in the North Carolina collection, Joyner Library at East Carolina University, where he writes the North Carolina Periodicals Index, an index of abstracts of articles from magazines published in North Carolina. He has written over 10,000 abstracts of articles and compiled and self-published 52 monographs of North Carolina history and genealogy.

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