Confidence Men: Wall Street, Washington, and the Education of a President

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Harper Collins, Sep 20, 2011 - History - 528 pages
5 Reviews

The hidden history of Wall Street and the White House comes down to a single, powerful, quintessentially American concept: confidence. Both centers of power, tapping brazen innovations over the past three decades, learned how to manufacture it. But in August 2007, that confidence finally began to crumble.

In this gripping and brilliantly reported book, Ron Suskind tells the story of what happened next, as Wall Street struggled to save itself while a man with little experience and soaring rhetoric emerged from obscurity to usher in "a new era of responsibility." It is a story that follows the journey of Barack Obama, who rose as the country fell, offering the first full portrait of his tumultuous presidency.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - publiusdb - LibraryThing

Ron Suskind's a good writer, but he's also in love with Barack Obama. Well, maybe not in love, but he's certainly not an objective or dispassionate observer. Even while he's observing that Obama may ... Read full review

CONFIDENCE MEN: Wall Street, Washington, and the Education of a President

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Is it too early for a postmortem on Barack Obama? Not for Pulitzer winner Suskind (The Way of the World: A Story of Truth and Hope in an Age of Extremism, 2008), who offers a damning picture of the ... Read full review

Contents

The Warning
3
4
5
The Rise
The BTeam
Photographs
A New Deal
12
13
14
Part III
Mind the
Business as Usual
Gods Work
The Man They Elected

Well Managed
The Covenant
11
Acknowledgments
About the Author
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

RON SUSKIND is the author of The Way of the World, The One Percent Doctrine, The Price of Loyalty, and A Hope in the Unseen. From 1993 to 2000 he was the senior national affairs writer for The Wall Street Journal, where he won a Pulitzer Prize. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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