Confucian Thought: Selfhood as Creative Transformation

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SUNY Press, 1985 - Religion - 203 pages
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Confucian Thought: Selfhood as Creative Transformation is a collection of Tu s seminal essays. It is a sustained deliberation on the substance and worth of the Confucian conception of personhood. This analysis complements Tu s highly acclaimed Humanity and Self-Cultivation: Essays in Confucian Thought as a continued expression of his deepening understanding of Confucianism voiced through various perennial human concerns.
Tu weaves philosophic, historical, anthropological, sociological, and psychological perspectives into a coherent discussion of the Confucian themes that continue to inspire the modern intellectual mind. His is a vital contribution to Chinese thought and religion."
 

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Contents

The Moral Universal from the Perspectives of East Asian Thought
19
The Continuity of Being Chinese Visions of Nature
35
A Confucian Perspective on Learning to be Human
51
The Value of the Human in Classical Confucian Thought
67
Jen as a Living Metaphor in the Confucian Analects
81
The Idea of the Human in Mencian Thought An Approach to Chinese Aesthetics
93
Selfhood and Otherness The FatherSon Relationship in Confucian Thought
113
NeoConfucian Religiosity and HumanRelatedness
131
NeoConfucian Ontology A Preliminary Questioning
149
Glossary
171
Bibliography of Tu Weiming
189
Index
197
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Page 17 - The Puritan wanted to work in a calling; we are forced to do so. For when asceticism was carried out of monastic cells into everyday life, and began to dominate worldly morality, it did its part in building the tremendous cosmos of the modern economic order. This order is now bound to the technical and economic conditions of machine production which today determine the lives of all the individuals who are born into this mechanism, not only those directly concerned with economic acquisition, with...
Page 17 - This order is now bound to the technical and economic conditions of machine production which to-day determine the lives of all the individuals who are born into this mechanism, not only those directly concerned with economic acquisition, with irresistible force. Perhaps it will so determine them until the last ton of fossilized coal is burnt. In Baxter's view the care for external goods should only lie on the shoulders of the "saint like a light cloak, which can be thrown aside at any moment".

References to this book

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About the author (1985)

Tu Wei-ming is Professor of Chinese History and Philosophy and Chairman of the Committee on the Study of Religion at Harvard University.

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