Confucianism for the Modern World

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Daniel A. Bell, Hahm Chaibong
Cambridge University Press, Sep 8, 2003 - History - 383 pages
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While Confucian ideals continue to inspire thinkers and political actors, discussions of concrete Confucian practices and institutions appropriate for the modern era have been conspicuously absent from the literature thus far. This volume represents the most cutting edge effort to spell out in meticulous detail the relevance of Confucianism for the contemporary world. The contributors to this book--internationally renowned philosophers, lawyers, historians, and social scientists--argue for feasible and desirable Confucian policies and institutions as they attempt to draw out the political, economic, and legal implications of Confucianism for the modern world.
 

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Contents

The Contemporary Relevance of Confucianism
1
CONFUCIAN PERSPECTIVES ON DEMOCRACY
29
Constitutionalism Confucian Civic Virtue and Ritual Propriety
31
The Challenge of Accountability Implications of the Censorate
54
Confucian Democrats in Chinese History
69
Mutual Help and Democracy in Korea
90
A Pragmatist Understanding of Confucian Democracy
124
The Case for Moral Education
161
Confucian Constraints on Property Rights
218
Giving Priority to the Worst Off A Confucian Perspective on Social Welfare
236
CONFUCIAN PERSPECTIVES ON LAW
255
Mediation Litigation and Justice Confucian Reflections in a Modern Liberal Society
257
Traditional Confucian Values and Western Legal Frameworks The Law of Succession
288
The Confucian Conception of Gender in the TwentyFirst Century
312
Family Versus the Individual The Politics of Marriage Laws in Korea
334
Why Confucius Now?
361

CONFUCIAN PERSPECTIVES ON CAPITALISM
179
CenterLocal Relations Can Confucianism Boost Decentralization and Regionalism?
181
Affective Networks and Modernity The Case of Korea
201

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About the author (2003)

Daniel Bell, an American sociologist and journalist, studied at City College of New York and Columbia University. As a journalist he was an editor of Fortune magazine and later served on several presidential committees. His work as chairman of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences' Commission on the Year 2000 led to the publication of a collection of futuristic essays and discussions by some of the finest minds of the century. His teaching career included posts at Chicago, Columbia, and Harvard universities. In Bell's best-known book, The Coming of Post-Industrial Society (1976), he analyzed the emerging role of information technology in the West. He was among the first scholars to realize that the production of information and knowledge would eclipse manufacturing in the developed world. Bell will be most remembered for his groundbreaking work in social change. He contended that new theories and models of decision making had to be devised to address the issues presented by an information-based society.

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