Consciousness and Revolution in Soviet Philosophy: From the Bolsheviks to Evald Ilyenkov

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jun 28, 1991 - Philosophy - 292 pages
0 Reviews
This is the first critical history of the philosophical culture of the USSR, and the first substantial treatment of a modern Soviet philosopher's work by a Western author. The book identifies a significant tradition within Soviet Marxism that has produced powerful theories exploring the origins of meaning and value, the relation of thought and language, and the nature of the self. The tradition is presented through the work of Evald Ilyenkov (1924-79), the thinker who did the most to rejuvenate Soviet philosophy after its suppression under Stalin. Professor Bakhurst sets Ilyenkov's contribution against the background of the bitter debates that divided Soviet philosophers in the 1920s, the "sociohistorical psychology" of Vygotsky, the controversies over Lenin's legacy, and the philosophy of Stalinism. He traces Ilyenkov's tense relationship with the Soviet philosophical establishment and his passionate polemics with Soviet opponents. This book offers a unique insight into the world of Soviet philosophy, the place of politics within it, and its prospects in the age of glasnost and perestroika.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Deborinites Mechanists and Bolshevizera
25
The defeat of the Mechanists
45
The philosophical significance of the controversy
52
Vygotsky
59
Lenin and the Leninist stage in Soviet philosophy
91
Ilyenkov and dialectical method
135
The problem of the ideal
175
Rethinking thought
217
In conclusion
259
References
267
Index
285
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information