Consolidation of Schools and Transportation of Pupils at Public Expense in Massachusetts

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Division of elementary and secondary education and normal schools, 1920 - School children - 27 pages
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Page 19 - For conveying pupils to and from the public schools, or, if it maintains no high school or public school of corresponding grade but affords high school instruction by sending pupils to other towns, for the necessary transportation expenses of such pupils, the same to be expended by the school committee in its discretion.
Page 20 - The board of education shall approve the high schools which may be attended by such pupils, and it may, for this purpose, approve a public high school in an adjoining state. Whenever, in the judgment of the...
Page 19 - ... all the liquors made by him or for him, and all the vessels, utensils, and apparatus used in making the same, and be liable to a penalty of not less than five hundred nor more than one thousand dollars, to be recovered with costs of suit, and shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and be imprisoned for a term not exceeding one year.
Page 19 - Every town shall provide and maintain a sufficient number of schoolhouses, properly furnished and conveniently located for the accommodation of all children entitled to attend the public schools...
Page 19 - If said distance exceeds three miles, and the distance between the child's residence and a school in an adjoining town giving substantially equivalent instruction is less than three miles, and the school committee declines to pay for tuition in such nearer school, and for transportation in case the distance thereto exceeds two miles, the department, upon like appeal, may require the town of residence to pay for tuition in, and if necessary provide for transportation for a part or for the whole of...
Page 6 - Schoolhouses in case it decided to abolish the districts; and before 1860 from 80 to 100 towns and cities containing one-half the inhabitants of the State had voluntarily abandoned the district system. At about this time the contest began in the General Court. In the spring session of 1859 the district was abolished, but the resentment on the part of many towns was so keen that it was speedily restored by the Legislature in the succeeding fall. In 1869 the district was again abolished, but virtually...
Page 20 - ... in which they attend school and their homes, whether such schoolhouses are located in the city or town in which the pupils reside or in another city or town, shall not exceed one half the regular fare charged by such street or elevated railway company for the transportation of other...
Page 20 - ... under the provisions of chapter five hundred and five of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and six and acts in amendment thereof...
Page 19 - Any town in this Commonwealth may raise by taxation or otherwise, and appropriate money to bo expended by the school committee in their discretion, in providing for the conveyance of pnpils to and from the public schools.
Page 20 - The rates of fare charged by street or elevated railway companies for the transportation of pupils of the public day schools or public evening schools or private schools between a given point, from or to which it is necessary for them to ride in travelling to or from the schoolhouses in which they attend school and their homes, whether such schoolhouses are located in the city or town in which...

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