Constituting Modernity: Private Property in the East and West

Front Cover
Huri Islamoglu
I.B.Tauris, May 28, 2004 - Political Science - 335 pages
0 Reviews
Constituting Modernity originated from a critique of a liberal understanding of property relation as one between a person and a 'thing'. States are perceived to be fundamental obstacles on the way to an individual's appropriation of the "thing". State intervention is often considered to be a reason for a presumed absence of private property in non-European contexts. The research presented here contests these assumptions from different perspectives, both in a European and non-European context. As multi-disciplinary as it is wide-ranging, the work ranges from the practices of the 19th century Ottoman administrative government in the constitution of private property rights to the practice of cadastral mapping in British India. These essays, carefully prepared in full collaboration as part of a unified research program, cover Ottoman and British land laws, property rights in the British colonies, and the notion of property as a contested domain and a site of power relations in 19th century China. No such interdisciplinary study of private property exists. Constituting Modernity will not only set the tone of much research to come, but reworks the fundamental theory behind the scholarship to date.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Towards a Political Economy of Legal
3
East
35
Sovereignty Property Land and Labour
69
Jaffa
100
A Necessary
149
Intersections
180
Late Ottoman Southern
214
Negotiation of Property Rights in Urban Land
248
Law
276
Index
321
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Huri Islamoglu teaches economic history and political economy at Bogaziši University, Istanbul and at the Central European University, Budapest.

Bibliographic information