Constitutional History of the American Revolution: The Authority of Law

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Univ of Wisconsin Press, 2003 - History - 279 pages
This is the first comprehensive study of the constitutionality of the Parliamentary legislation cited by the American Continental Congress as a justification for its rebellion against Great Britain in 1776. The content and purpose of that legislation is well known to historians, but here John Phillip Reid places it in the context of eighteenth-century constitutional doctrine and discusses its legality in terms of the intellectual premises of eighteenth-century Anglo-American legal values.
 

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Contents

THE COERCIVE ACTS
9
The Massachusetts Acts
12
The Quebec Act
23
THE COERCIVE GRIEVANCE
27
The Arbitrary Grievance
29
The Liberty Grievance
37
THE SUPREMACY ISSUE
43
The Supremacy Cause
47
The Problems of Representation
99
Representation Rejected
102
INTERMEDIATE SOLUTIONS
108
The Galloway Plan
112
PARLIAMENTARY SOLUTIONS
119
The Repeal Solution
125
RIGHT ACKNOWLEDGMENT AND RENUNCIATION SOLUTIONS
134
The Acknowledgment Solution
138

THE GLORIOUS REVOLUTION ISSUE
52
The Kingliness of Parliament
55
The Englishness of Americans
60
Revolution Principles
63
THE LIBERTY ISSUE
69
The Security Issue
72
The SubjectsofSubjects Issue
76
THE REPRESENTATION ISSUE
83
The Autonomy Issue
88
REPRESENTATION SOLUTIONS
97
The Renunciation Solution
142
The Dernier Solution
149
PREROGATIVE SOLUTIONS
151
CONCLUSION
163
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
177
SHORT TITLES
179
NOTES
221
INDEX
267
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

John Phillip Reid is professor of law at New York University.