Constitutional Money: A Review of the Supreme Court's Monetary Decisions

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 8, 2013 - Business & Economics - 247 pages
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This book reviews nine Supreme Court cases and decisions that dealt with monetary laws and gives a summary history of monetary events and policies as they were affected by the Court's decisions. Several cases and decisions had notable consequences on the monetary history of the United States, some of which were blatant misjudgments stimulated by political pressures. The cases included in this book begin with McCulloch v. Maryland in 1819 and end with the Gold Clause Cases in 1934-35. Constitutional Money examines three institutions that were prominent in these decisions: the Supreme Court, the gold standard, and the Federal Reserve System. The final chapter describes the adjustments necessary to return to a gold standard and briefly examines the constitutional alternatives.
 

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Contents

The Current Condition of Monetary Affairs in the United States
1
The Emergence of Money in Civilized Societies
4
The Bimetallic Monetary System and Appearance of a National Bank
10
McCulloch 11 Maryland 1819
21
To Coin Money and Regulate the Value Thereof
35
Craig 11 Missouri 1830
39
Briscoe v The Bank ofthe Commonwealth ofKentucky 1837
47
No
49
Monetary Affairs in the United States 18711883
105
uilliard v Greenman 1884
119
The Issue of Sovereignty
129
Other Commentaries on the Legal Tender Cases
144
The Gold Currency Act of 1900 and Monetary Affairs in the United States before 1914
156
The Federal Reserve System 19141929
162
The Great Contraction 19291933
170
Gold Where Did It Go? Why Didnt the Gold Standard Work?
177

Federal Government Issues of Treasury Notes and Greenbacks
56
The Track of the Legal Tender Bills through Congress
62
Bronson v Rodes 1868
72
Veazie Bank v Fenno 1869
79
The Legal Tender Issue
86
Reversal of Hepburn
97
The Gold Clause Cases 19341935
182
Gold and Monetary Affairs in the Twentieth Century
206
A Constitutional Monetary System
221
Index
235
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Richard H. Timberlake is an Emeritus Professor of Economics at the University of Georgia and an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute. His research specialties are monetary policy and the history of central banking. Dr Timberlake's most recent publications include Monetary Policy in the United States: An Institutional and Intellectual History and Money and the Nation State, with Kevin Dowd. He received his PhD from the University of Chicago.

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