Constructing Test Items: Multiple-Choice, Constructed-Response, Performance and Other Formats

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 31, 1997 - Education - 339 pages
0 Reviews
Constructing test items for standardized tests of achievement, ability, and aptitude is a task of enormous importance. The interpretability of a test's scores flows directly from the quality of its items and exercises. Concomitant with score interpretability is the notion that including only carefully crafted items on a test is the primary method by which the skilled test developer reduces unwanted error variance, or errors of measurement, and thereby increases a test score's reliability. The aim of this entire book is to increase the test constructor's awareness of this source of measurement error, and then to describe methods for identifying and minimizing it during item construction and later review.
Persons involved in assessment are keenly aware of the increased attention given to alternative formats for test items in recent years. Yet, in many writers' zeal to be `curriculum-relevant' or `authentic' or `realistic', the items are often developed seemingly without conscious thought to the interpretations that may be garnered from them. This book argues that the format for such alternative items and exercises also requires rigor in their construction and even offers some solutions, as one chapter is devoted to these alternative formats.
This book addresses major issues in constructing test items by focusing on four ideas. First, it describes the characteristics and functions of test items. A second feature of this book is the presentation of editorial guidelines for writing test items in all of the commonly used item formats, including constructed-response formats and performance tests.
A third aspect of this book is the presentation of methods for determining the quality of test items. Finally, this book presents a compendium of important issues about test items, including procedures for ordering items in a test, ethical and legal concerns over using copyrighted test items, item scoring schemes, computer-generated items and more.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

What This Book Is About
6
Chapter 3
59
Chapter 4
106
Chapter 7
112
Chapter 5
161
Chapter 6
203
Items in Other Common Formats
215
Chapter 8
253
Chapter 9
300
References
311
Author Index 327
326
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1997)

Dr. Steven J. Osterlind is Professor of Measurement and Statistics and Director of Educational Psychology program, University of Missouri-Columbia. Dr. Osterlind s expertise is in psychological assessment, including tests and measurement, statistics, psychometric methods and test development. He received his doctoral degree in 1976 in Educational Psychology (Measurement & Statistics) from the University of Southern California. In 1979, he was an American Scholar s Fellow at Yale University. At the University of Missouri he teaches graduate-level courses in multivariate statistics, analysis of variance, regression, general linear modeling, and psychometric methods. Additionally, he teaches seminar courses on specialized topics, including Item Response Theory and Computer Applications of Testing. He has worked on numerous national testing programs, including serving as statistician for NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress). In licensing and certification, he has worked with dozens of professional associations and organizations on their assessment programs. Dr. Osterlind has authored five books, the most recent of which is a major textbook titled Modern Measurement: Theory, Principles, and Application of Mental Appraisal; and, he has written more than 60 articles, book chapters, and other research reports in assessment. Additionally, he has authored more than 20 tests. He is principle author of College Basic Academic Subjects Examination (C-BASE), a test of collegiate achievement test currently adopted by more than 100 universities across the nation.

Bibliographic information