Consumer-Centric Category Management: How to Increase Profits by Managing Categories Based on Consumer Needs

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John Wiley & Sons, Jun 12, 2012 - Business & Economics - 368 pages
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In some parts of the world, especially in developing markets, category management today remains a stretch goal – a new idea full of untapped potential. In other areas, the original eight-step process that emerged in the late 1980’s forms the foundation of many companies’ approach to category management. In still others, particularly in developed countries like the U.S., the U.K., and others, refinements are being made – most of them designed to place consumer understanding front and center.

New ideas are emerging – from "trip management" to "aisle management" to "customer management." Whether a new descriptor emerges to replace "category management" is yet to be seen. Even if that does happen, what won’t change is the overall objective – to help retailers and their manufacturer partners succeed by offering the right selection of products that are marketed and merchandised based on a complete understanding of the consumers they are committed to serving.

This book, which explores both the state of and the state-of-the-art in category management, is for everyone with a vested interest in category management. It can serve such a broad audience because category management is about bringing a structured process to how executives think and make decisions about their businesses, no matter what information and information technology they have access to.

 

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Contents

What Reviews Might Reveal
Stay with Your Category or Not
CHAPTER 11
Step by Step
ConsumerCentric Assessments
Setting Strategies
Getting Tactical
Keeping Score by Cluster

Role of the Manufacturer
Category Captain
Supporting Players
The Promise of Category Management
CHAPTER 2
Components of a Good Strategy
How Do You Develop a Strategy?
Retail Branding
Who Is the Competition?
WalMart
Bringing Clarity to Channel Definitions
Establishing the Mission
Financial and Performance Scorecards
Communicate Strategy
Here Are the Winners
Conclusion
PART II
CHAPTER 3
Shoppers Come with Changing Missions
Variations on a Theme
Moving On
CHAPTER 4
A 360Degree View Delivers Results
The Art and Science of Role Assignment
Variations on a Theme
Moving On
CHAPTER 5
Four Perspectives
The Search for Actionable Insights
Assess Private Label the Same as Other Brands
LowerCost Ways to Assess
CHAPTER 6
One Size Does Not Fit All
Technology Helps
Common Pitfalls
How Often Is Often Enough?
Top Shopper Scorecards
CHAPTER 7
A Multilevel Approach
Focus First on Consumers
Product Supply Strategies
Including the Manufacturer Perspective
CHAPTER 8
Assortment
Pricing
Promotion
Decisions to Make
Supply Chain Management
Moving On
CHAPTER 9
Execute and Reap Rewards
Where Shelf Sets Can Go Wrong
Pricing and Promotion Must Synchronize
Moving On
CHAPTER 10
Implementation
PART III
CHAPTER 12
ConsumerDriven Approach
Working with Retailers
CHAPTER 13
Organization
Eight Steps
Future
CHAPTER 14
Todays Process
Focus on the Consumer
Challenge for Wholesalers
Whats in Store for the Future?
CHAPTER 15
Working with Retailers
Category Captain or Validator?
The Role of Technology
CHAPTER 16
Working with Retailers
The Role of Technology
CHAPTER 17
Produce Is Unique
Some History
Technology Improvements
Consumers First
Execution and Compliance
CHAPTER 18
Organizational Structure
The Classic Eight Steps
Technology
Working as Category Captain
CHAPTER 19
Market Structure
Organization
Whats on Tap?
CHAPTER 20
Start with the Basics
Step by Step
PART IV
CHAPTER 21
Process
Closing Thoughts
CHAPTER 22
CHAPTER 23
Loyalty MarketingA Brief History
Loyalty MarketingKey Insights
Give the Customer a Seat at the Table
ShareofWallet
Top Shopper Index
Loyalty Strategy
Top Shopper Insight
Conclusion
CHAPTER 24
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

ACNielsen, a VNU business, is the world's leading marketing information provider. Offering services in more than 100 coun-tries, the unit provides measurement and analysis of marketplace dynamics and consumer attitudes and behavior.

JOHN KAROLESKI is Editor of an e-magazine called CPGmatters.com. It covers in-store marketing and category management. He is the coauthor of two books, Target 2000: The Rising Tide of TechnoMarketing and All About Sampling. He was formerly senior editor of Supermarket News and editor in chief of Brand Marketing.

AL HELLER, President of Dis-tinct Communications, LLC, is the author of numerous consumer packaged goods industry studies and three books. He was formerly editor in chief of Nonfoods Merchandising and Supermarket HQ Quarterly, and executive editor of Drug Store News.

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