Contact Englishes of the Eastern Caribbean

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Michael Aceto, Jeffrey Payne Williams
John Benjamins Publishing, Jan 1, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 320 pages
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Contact Englishes of the Eastern Caribbean is the first collection to focus, via primary linguistic fieldwork, on the underrepresented and neglected area of the Anglophone Eastern Caribbean. The following islands are included: The Virgin Islands (USA & British), Anguilla, Barbuda, Dominica, St. Lucia, Carriacou, Barbados, Trinidad, and Guyana. In an effort to be as inclusive as possible, the contiguous areas of the Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos islands (often considered part of North American Englishes) are also included. Papers in this volume explore all aspects of language study, including syntax, phonology, historical linguistics, dialectology, sociolinguistics, ethnography, and performance. It should be of interest not only to creolists but also to linguists, anthropologists, sociologists and educators either in the Caribbean itself or those who work with schoolchildren of West Indian descent.
 

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Contents

Phonological accommodation
1
The grammatical features of TMA auxiliaries in Bahamian Creole
29
A look at Grand Turk
51
Plural markings
81
The establishment and perpetuation of Anglophone white enclave
95
What are Creole languages? An alternative approach to
121
Language variation and language use among teachers in Dominica
141
On the sociohistorical origins
155
Linguistic creativity in a Creole
211
A sketch and some implications
227
Beyond Meso
241
A comparative view with
265
References
297
Index
317
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About the author (2003)

Jeffrey P. Williams is Professor of Anthropology at Texas Tech University. He previously taught at the University of Sydney and Cleveland State University. Most recently he edited The Aesthetics of Grammar: Sound and Meaning in the Languages of Mainland Southeast Asia (Cambridge University Press, 2014).

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