Contemporary American Indian Writing: Unsettling Literature

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Peter Lang, 1999 - Literary Criticism - 218 pages
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Starting with the premise that American Indians have been colonized, Horne outlines the dangers of colonial mimicry. She proposes a theory of subversive mimicry through which writers can use the language of the colonial power to subvert it and inscribe diverse First Nations voices. Drawing on select works by Thomas King, Beatrice Culleton, Ruby Slipperjack, Jeannette Armstrong, Lee Maracle, and Tomson Highway, the study also elucidates decolonizing strategies with which readers can collaborate.
 

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Contents

Chapter Two To Know the Difference
25
Chapter Three Listening to Silences
51
Chapter Four Stereotypography
71
Chapter Five Replace That Monument
85
Chapter Six Ravens Song
111
Chapter Seven Tricking InSubordination
127
Epilogue New Relations New Directions
153
Bibliography
177
Index
199
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About the author (1999)

The Author: Dee Horne is Associate Professor in the English Department at the University of Northern British Columbia. She received her Ph.D. in English from the University of Toronto. She has published numerous articles in professional journals and teaches First Nations literature.

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