Contemporary Criminal Law: Concepts, Cases, and Controversies

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SAGE, Sep 25, 2009 - Law - 639 pages
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Contemporary Criminal Law, Second Edition combines the traditional concepts and cases found in undergraduate texts with unique learning tools, resulting in an engaging, modern text that has enjoyed success with students and instructors nationwide. The text covers both traditional and cutting-edge topics, such as terrorism, computer crimes, and hate crimes, in a student-friendly way. Clear explanations of criminal law and defenses are complemented by provocative, well-edited cases followed by discussion questions to stimulate critical thinking and in-class discussion.

The Second Edition includes a number of new cases to illuminate important concepts such as the insanity defense and terrorism, many new learning features, and updates throughout, highlighting the most recent developments in criminal law. A more concise focus on domestic criminal law also characterizes this new edition. Best of all, this new edition continues to be significantly more affordable than most other texts for this course.

 

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Contents

The Nature Purpose and Function of Criminal Law
1
Chapter Summary
12
Reading and Briefing Cases
15
Constitutional Limitations
21
Punishment and Sentencing
52
Actus Reus
84
Mens Rea Concurrence Causation
113
Parties to Crime and Vicarious Liability
146
Homicide
368
State
387
Burglary Trespass Arson and Mischief
419
Crimes Against Property
446
WhiteCollar Crime
494
Crimes Against Public Order and Morality
523
Crimes Against the State
564
Notes
600

Attempt Conspiracy and Solicitation
178
Justifications
216
Excuses
270
Age
295
united StateS v ContentopaChon
305
Criminal Sexual Conduct Assault and Battery Kidnapping and False Imprisonment
324
Glossary
609
Case Index
617
Subject Index
621
About the Author
639
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Matthew Lippman has taught criminal law and criminal procedure in the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) for more than twenty years. He has also taught courses on civil liberties, law and society, and terrorism and teaches international criminal law at John Marshall Law School in Chicago. He earned a Doctorate in Political Science from Northwestern University, a Master of Law from Harvard Law School, and is a member of the Pennsylvania Bar. He has been voted by the graduating seniors at UIC to receive the Silver Circle Award for outstanding teaching on six separate occasions and has also received the UIC Flame Award from the University of Illinois Alumni Association, as well as the Excellence in Teaching Award, Teaching Recognition (Portfolio) Award, and Honors College Fellow of the Year Award. The university chapter of Alpha Phi Sigma, the criminal justice honors society, named him “criminal justice professor of the year” on three occasions. In 2008, Professor Lippman was named College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Master Teacher. He is also recognized in Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers, and in May 2012 he was honored by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, which named him Commencement Marshal. Professor Lippman is author of more than 100 articles and 3 books. These publications focus on criminal law and criminal procedure, international human rights, and comparative law. Professor Lippman is the author of Contemporary Criminal Law: Concepts, Cases, and Controversies, Third Edition (SAGE, 2013) His work is cited in hundreds of academic publications and by international courts and organizations. He has also served on legal teams appearing before the International Court of Justice in the Hague, U.S. district and appellate courts, and the U.S. Supreme Court. Professor Lippman also has testified as an expert witness on international law before numerous state and federal courts, and has consulted with both private organizations and branches of the U.S. government. He has appeared as a radio and television commentator and has been frequently quoted in leading newspapers. He has served in every major administrative position in the Criminal Justice Department, including Department Head.

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