Contemporary Security Management

Front Cover
Butterworth-Heinemann, 2006 - Business & Economics - 523 pages
1 Review
SHORT BLURB/BRIEF DESCRIPTION:
This is the third in a series of proposals for new editions of existing texts that have been adopted by DeVry University. In this case, the Keller Graduate School of Management at DeVry University has adopted Contemporary Security Management for their Master's Degree Program in Business Administration, Security Management concentration. It is at Keller's request that we update the material presented by John Fay in his original edition of the work.

CONTEMPORARY SECURITY MANAGEMENT, 2e will be updated from the successful first edition which provides current, experience-proven business practices applicable to security operations. Vital topics covered include: managing in times of risk, target-hardening against terrorism, and strategies for cross-functional leadership.
The author proposes he add two new chapters to cover terrorism and the new government mandate to perform standard vulnerability assessments for various industries. His outline of proposed changes is as follows:
The Terrorist Threat
o International -- Al Qaeda; Hezbollah; Hamas; FLN; Sendero Luminoso; etc.
o Domestic -- Aryan Nation; Animal Liberation Front; Environmental Liberation Front; etc.
Terrorist Motivations
Political; Religious; Racial; Environmental; Special Interest
The Early Signals of Terrorism
Target Surveillance; Information Collection; Tests of Security; Acquisition of Supplies; Dry Runs; Positioning to Act
Rating the Terrorist Group
History; Current Configuration; Capabilities; Resolve; Target Preferences
Weapons of Major Concern
Chemical; Biological; Radiological; Nuclear; Explosive; Incendiary
Vulnerability Factors
Visibility of the Potential Target; Criticality of the Potential Target; Probability of Attack; Potential Consequences; Adversary Access and Proximity; Population Casualties; Collateral Damage
Vulnerability Assessment Models
Generic; Industry Specific --Petroleum; Chemical; etc.
Vulnerabilities of Facilities
Power; Water; Sewage; IT; HVAC
Special Targets
Government Buildings; High-Impact Industrial Facilities; Financial Centers; Entertainment Venues; Schools; Hospitals; Food Supply Systems; Transportation Systems
Applicable Security Concepts
All hazards and Design-Basis Analyses; Environmental Design; Stand-off Distance; Protection in Depth; Redundancy; Operations Security (OPSEC); Mitigation and remediation
Security Plan Development
Gather and Analyze Data; Identify Critical Assets; Assess Current Protective Scheme; Identify Needs (Physical Security; Procedures; Manpower);; Write the Plan; Multidisciplinary Buy-In; Organize, Equip, and Train; Rehearse; Evaluate
Samples
Vulnerability Assessment Checklist; Elements of a Security Plan; Department of Energy Best Practices

Ancillary material: Instructor's Manual and Power Point Slides

UNIQUE FEATURE:
An experience-proven, practical approach to the business of security
Author, John Fay, is very well known among security professionals and his sensible, down-to-earth style is accessible to those new to the business

BENEFIT TO THE READER:
Case studies throughout the text provide real-world examples and solutions to management issues.
Samples of security plans and procedures, checklists, diagrams and illustrations aid in explaining a wide range of critical concepts
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Historical Roots
1
2 Strategy
15
3 Leading
29
4 Organizing
41
5 Managing People
61
6 Budget Management
81
7 Managing Change
95
8 Making Decisions
105
16 Incident Management
253
17 Information Security
289
18 Substance Abuse Prevention
321
19 Executive Protection
339
20 Workplace Violence
355
21 Security Awareness
377
22 Vulnerability Assessment
381
23 Security System Design
395

9 Managing Risk
111
10 Managing Guard Operations
135
11 Managing Physical Security
153
12 Managing Access Control
177
13 Managing Investigations
197
14 Preemployment Screening
217
15 Emergency Management
229
24 The Nature of Terrorism
405
25 Counterterrorism
423
26 Weapons of Mass Destruction
445
27 Assessment of the Terrorist Threat
467
28 Critical National Infrastructure
477
Index
507
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xiv - That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons that history has to teach.

References to this book

About the author (2006)

Mr. Fay was a special agent of the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Division (CID) and later the Director of the National Crime Prevention Institute at the University of Louisville. He has held security management positions in the petroleum industry while teaching at the university level. He holds the Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Hawaii, and is a well-known and respected author of many books, including Butterworth's Security Dictionary: Terms and Concepts, Drug Testing, Encyclopedia of Security Management: Techniques and Technology, and Model Security Policies, Plans, and Procedures, all by Butterworth-Heinemann.Was a special agent of the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Division (CID) and later the Director of the National Crime Prevention Institute. Former manager of security for British Petroleum's operations in the Gulf of Mexico. He was previously an adjunct professor at the University of North Florida and the University of Houston.

Bibliographic information