Contemporary Theorists for Medical Sociology

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Graham Scambler
Routledge, 2012 - Health & Fitness - 202 pages
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Contemporary Theorists for Medical Sociology explores the work of key social theorists and the application of their ideas to issues around health and illness.

Encouraging students and researchers to use mainstream sociological thought to inform and deepen their knowledge and understanding of the many arenas of health and healthcare, this text discusses and critically reviews the work of several influential contemporary thinkers, including – Foucault, Bauman, Habermas, Luhmann, Bourdieu, Merleau-Ponty, Wallerstein, Archer, Deleuze, Guattari, and Castells.

Each chapter includes a critical introduction to the central theses of a major social theorist, ways in which their ideas might inform medical sociology and some worked examples of how their ideas can be applied. Containing contributions from established scholars, rising stars and innovative practitioners, this book is a valuable read for those studying and researching the sociology of health and illness.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Foucault health and healthcare
7
Zygmunt Bauman on the difference between fitness and health
20
3 Jürgen Habermas Politics and morality in health and medicine
33
4 Luhmanns social systems theory health and illness
49
5 Bourdieu and the impact of health and illness in the lifeworld
71
6 MerleauPonty medicine and the body
87
7 World systems theory and the epidemiological transition Martin Hyde and Anthony Rosie
104
8 Archer morphogenesis and the role of agency in the sociology of health inequalities
131
9 Deleuze and Guattari
150
10 Health and medicine in the information age Castells informational capitalism and the network society
167
Index
193
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About the author (2012)

Graham Scambler is Professor of Medical Sociology at University College London, UK.

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