Contemporary world television

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BFI, Jun 26, 2004 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 131 pages
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What is happening today in the world of world television? With intense commercialization and more open national markets, along with technological convergence and greater concentration of ownership, the international TV landscape is changing at a bewildering pace and in a host of different ways.
"Contemporary World Television "presents a unique overview of the global issues raised by these transformations in television. It looks at how they have affected the public interest and society across the globe and how the role of television as a nation-builder is experiencing erosion and evolution. The book's host of international expert contributors also examine TV's handling of news, and sexual content and its role in military conflicts. As well, they provide current assessments of how the global trends have diversely affected many different countries, regions, or language communities outside the Anglophone mainstream.
Fully illustrated, the book also uses case studies and selected reading guides and thus provides a transparent and accessible but in-depth introduction to central developments, issues, and concerns in contemporary world television.

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Contents

TELEVISION AND THE PUBLIC INTEREST
1
Challenge Adaptation and Survival Manuel Alvarado
7
Commercialisation of News and Current Affairs Daniel C Hallin
13
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

John Sinclair is Professor of International Communication at Victoria University of Technology, Melbourne, author of Latin American Television: A Global View (1999), and coeditor of New Patterns in Global Television: Peripheral Vision (1996). Graeme Turner is Professor of Cultural Studies and the Director for Critical and Cultural Studies at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. He is the coauthor of The Australian TV Book (2000).

University of Queensland