Contempt of Court: A Scholar's Battle for Free Speech from Behind Bars

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Rowman Altamira, 2005 - Political Science - 223 pages
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In 1993 Rik Scarce was imprisoned for contempt of court in Spokane, Washington. For five months he refused to testify to a federal grand jury about his interviews with animal rights activists after they had broken into a research laboratory, and his story made headlines in numerous newspapers. Now Scarce tells of his jailing and the rationale behind his ethical stance, bringing an ethnographer's trained sensibility and a journalist's storytelling skill to his tale. Viewed as an outsider even by his fellow inmates, Scarce gained from his imprisonment a painful, rare glimpse of the jail world. This text raises serious questions about the failures of the American justice system and protection of civil liberties, and is a valuable resource for criminologists, sociologists, and corrections professionals.
 

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Contents

A Sense of Justice
1
Kicking Uncle Sams Ass
23
Find Me Some Amendments
73
The Meaning of Devotion
121
Id Gladly Die Right Now
151
Joint Joints
175
A Final Rollup
195
Some Things Do Not Come to Pass
203
Notes
217
Credits
221
About the Author
223
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Rik Scarce is the author of two books, Eco-Warriors: Understanding the Radical Environmental Movement (1990) and Fishy Business: Salmon, Biology, and the Social Construction of Nature (2000). He is a professor in the Department of Sociology at Skidmore College, and previously taught at Michigan State University and Montana State University. He has also been a newspaper reporter, worked as an aide to two politicians, and has done research and writing for a consulting firm.

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