Content and Meaning of National Law in the Context of Transnational Law

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Henricus Joseph Snijders, Stefan Vogenauer
sellier. european law publ., 2009 - Law - 222 pages
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This collection of essays by Dutch, English and Swiss scholars deals with the impact of transnational law, in particular the law of the European Union and the Council of Europe, on the content and meaning given to domestic law by national legislators and judges. Topics covered include the constitutional and practical implications of implementing transnational law at the national level, as well as the interpretation of domestic law against the background of the European Convention on Human Rights, the law of the European Union and so called "soft law" instruments in areas such as civil procedure, jurisdiction, contract, company law and competition law.
 

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Contents

III
1
IV
21
V
39
VI
53
VII
79
VIII
89
IX
101
X
113
XI
133
XII
157
XIII
197
XIV
213
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About the author (2009)

Stefan Vogenauer has been Professor of Comparative Law and Fellow at Brasenose College at the University of Oxford since 2003 and Director of the Oxford Institute of European and Comparative Law since 2004. He was born in 1968, read law in Kiel, Paris and Oxford and is qualified to practice in
Germany. Before taking up his post at Oxford he worked as a Research Assistant at the Regensburg Law Faculty, as a part-time Lecturer at the Bucerius Law School in Hamburg and as a Research Fellow at the Hamburg Max Planck Institute for Foreign Private Law and Private International Law. Apart from
comparative law his research interests lie in the fields of private law, European legal history and legal method.
Jan Kleinheisterkamp was born in 1971 in Peru and grew up in South Africa, Colombia, Spain, Germany, the USA and Brazil. He read law in Germany (Freiburg, Hannover) until 1998, and then worked as a research assistant for the Department on Latin American Law of the Max-Planck-Institute of Foreign
Private Law and Private International Law in Hamburg until 2002. From 2001 to 2003, he served as a clerk at the Superior Regional Court of Hamburg, delegated, inter alia, to the European Commission in Brussels. From 2003 to 2004, he worked as a research fellow at the Hamburg Max Planck Institute.
His doctoral thesis on international commercial arbitration in Latin America was awarded the distinction "summa cum laude." In 2004, Jan Kleinheisterkamp was named Assistant Professor at the HEC School of Management, Paris.

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