Contraceptive Research and Development: Looking to the Future

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Polly F. Harrison, Allan Rosenfield
National Academies Press, Nov 4, 1996 - Health & Fitness - 519 pages
The "contraceptive revolution" of the 1960s and 1970s introduced totally new contraceptive options and launched an era of research and product development. Yet by the late 1980s, conditions had changed and improvements in contraceptive products, while very important in relation to improved oral contraceptives, IUDs, implants, and injectables, had become primarily incremental. Is it time for a second contraceptive revolution and how might it happen?
Contraceptive Research and Development explores the frontiers of science where the contraceptives of the future are likely to be found and lays out criteria for deciding where to make the next R&D investments.
The book comprehensively examines today's contraceptive needs, identifies "niches" in those needs that seem most readily translatable into market terms, and scrutinizes issues that shape the market: method side effects and contraceptive failure, the challenge of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, and the implications of the "women's agenda."
Contraceptive Research and Development analyzes the response of the pharmaceutical industry to current dynamics in regulation, liability, public opinion, and the economics of the health sector and offers an integrated set of recommendations for public- and private-sector action to meet a whole new generation of demand.

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Contents

SUMMARY
1
INTRODUCTION
29
THE NEED AND DEMAND FOR
47
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Allan Rosenfield Lynn Freedman, Ron Waldman, Mushtaque Chowdhury, Coordinator led the UN Millennium Project Task Force on Child Health and Maternal Health. The UN Millennium Project and its Task Forces comprise more than 250 scientists, development practitioners, parliamentarians, policymakers, and representatives from civil society, UN agencies, the World Bank, the IMF, and the private sector.

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