Contract Negotiation Handbook

Front Cover
Gower Publishing, Ltd., 2001 - Reference - 337 pages
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Every organization enters into agreements for purchase and supply of goods and services, and most managers have some involvement in negotiating. Moreover the successful planning, execution and conclusion of contract negotiations can contribute directly to corporate profitability. The Contract Negotiation Handbook explains how the need to negotiate arises and how to form a negotiating plan. It sets out a structured approach to negotiation through all its various stages - preparing to negotiate, the opening of negotiations and how these develop at the negotiating table, and the closing and recording of the bargain. The use and misuse of certain tactics in negotiation are also covered. This classic text has now been thoroughly updated and revised, employing a more user-friendly approach. New features include a discussion of partnering and the importance of long-term relationships and contracts. The role of the psychology of bargaining is integrated throughout the text, rather than being treated as a separate entity.
 

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Contents

List of figures
1
Post tender negotiation
14
Planning for Negotiations
29
Data acquisition the negotiating environment and the other partys
37
Data acquisition objectives of the other side their level of commitment
48
Means of acquiring data
58
Setting the corporate objectives
67
Personal objectives of the negotiators
73
Commercial example of the prisoners dilemma
280
14 Example of nonzero sum game collaborative
281
The negotiating set
282
Commercial example of a game against nature
283
riskless utility of price and delivery
285
Additive utility values for price and delivery
286
competitive bidding purchasers
295
Bidders normal utility curve
299

Choice of strategy
87
Shortterm contracts level of the first offer
105
Contract dispute the first offer
119
The negotiating team
128
The negotiating brief
145
The opening
160
The followup
179
Identifying the bargain
203
Negotiation Tactics
223
Situation tactics
237
Epilogue
259
Expected value of an offer
266
4 Typical utility curves under risk
272
The theory of games
273
Example of zerosum game with saddle point
276
Al 1l Example of zerosum game no saddle point
277
Example of nonzero sum game
278
poor order book
300
full order book
301
poor order book and contractual risk
302
Graph of Partys success probability for a range of bids
304
Partys expected success probability
305
Expected utility to Party of a series of bids
307
Competitive bidding multiple opportunities
308
Decision tree of possible outcomes to multiple bids
310
multiple bids
311
Expected utility value to Party of a combination of two bids
312
Decision tree Partys bid against competitor A
313
Utility curve for marketing manager
314
The bargaining zone
318
Relationship of the above model to that proposed by Cross
322
Possible changes resulting from the presence of other competitors
332
Index
335
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

P D V Marsh, BA (Hons), is a retired solicitor. He began his commercial career with the National Coal Board where he became their Chief Contracts Officer. He later held senior posts with AEI Limited and Standard Telephones and Cables Limited where, for four years, he was Project Manager for their Submarine Telephone Cable Division. He then joined George Wimpey Ltd and became a director of Wimpey Major Projects Ltd. His last post before retiring was as Contracts Manager for the Transportation Systems Division of Transmanche Link. Since retiring in 1990 he has run his own consultancy practice.

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