Contracting Colonialism: Translation and Christian Conversion in Tagalog Society Under Early Spanish Rule

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Duke University Press, 1988 - History - 230 pages
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In an innovative mix of history, anthropology, and post-colonial theory, Vicente L. Rafael examines the role of language in the religious conversion of the Tagalogs to Catholicism and their subsequent colonization during the early period (1580–1705) of Spanish rule in the Philippines. By tracing this history of communication between Spaniards and Tagalogs, Rafael maps the conditions that made possible both the emergence of a colonial regime and resistance to it. Originally published in 1988, this new paperback edition contains an updated preface that places the book in theoretical relation to other recent works in cultural studies and comparative colonialism.
 

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Contents

Fishing Out the Past
1
The Politics of Translation
23
Tomas Pinpin and the Shock of Castilian
55
Conversion and the Demands of Confession
84
Untranslatability and the Terms of Reciprocity
110
Translating Submission
136
Paradise and the Reinvention of Death
167
Translation and the Colonial Legacy
210
Index
227
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About the author (1988)

Vicente L. Rafael is Professor of History at the University of Washington. He is the author of The Promise of the Foreign: Nationalism and the Technics of Translation in the Spanish Philippines and White Love and Other Events in Filipino History, both also published by Duke University Press.

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