Controlling Time and Shaping the Self: Developments in Autobiographical Writing Since the Sixteenth Century

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J. Arianne Baggerman, Rudolf M. Dekker, Michael James Mascuch
BRILL, Jun 22, 2011 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 560 pages
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This book explores new questions and approaches to the rise of autobiographical writing since the early modern period. What motivated more and more men and women to write records of their private life? How could private writing grow into a bestselling genre? How was this rapidly expanding genre influenced by new ideas about history that emerged around 1800? How do we explain the paradox of the apparent privacy of publicity in many autobiographies? Such questions are addressed with reference to well-known autobiographies and an abundance of newfound works by persons hitherto unknown, not only from Europe, but also the Near East, and Japan. This volume features new views of the complex field of historical autobiography studies, and is the first to put the genre in a global perspective.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
HISTORICIZING THE SELF
11
AUTOBIOGRAPHY SELFPRESENTATION AND COMMERCIAL PUBLISHING
229
CONTROLLING TIME AND SHAPING THE SELF
453
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Arianne Baggerman studied history at Erasmus University Rotterdam. She has published various books and articles in the fields of book history and cultural history. Professor Baggerman previously taught at the Utrecht University, and is now teaching history at Erasmus and is Professor of Book History at the University of Amsterdam. Rudolf Dekker studied history at the University of Amster dam. He has published a number of books and articles on social and cultural history. Recently, he published a survey of the History of the Netherlands. Michael Mascuch read Modern History at Cambridge University. His research has focused on early modern English culture and society. He now teaches in the Department of Rhetoric at the University of California at Berkeley.

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