Convention of Articulation Teachers of the Deaf

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E.S. Werner, 1884 - Deaf - 162 pages
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Page 86 - Where not even one invariable representative has been found for a given sound, one of those most common is meant to stand in this place. But next, and more needful perhaps, has been the attempt — II. To make letters mark themselves for pronunciation, to the greatest possible extent, by their position in words and their connection with other letters. Take, for example, the sound of long a. The simplest and most nearly invariable rule for...
Page 169 - JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. GOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 1878. His Celebrated Numbers 303—404—1 70—604—332 and his other styles, may be had of all dealers throughout the world. JOSEPH GttLOTT & SONS, NEW YOKK.
Page 168 - SINGING. Its value is testified to by scores of speech-sufferers and by leading MUSICIANS, EDUCATORS, CLERGYMEN and PHYSICIANS in different parts of the English-speaking world. Its contributors include LEADING SPECIALISTS of the VOICE, in America and in Europe. IS Indispensable to every Singer and Elocutionist ; A means of communicating necessary professional knowledge to every Physician and School Teacher ; Of great value to every Public Speaker ; A guide to Parents in directing and improving the...
Page 81 - The paper is a clear explanation of the phoTHIS question is one whose difficulty and importance are both sufficiently attested by its continual agitation in the public schools. To any learner, young or old, English spelling must make not a little hard the first steps in the crooked road to knowledge which lies that way ; and no one feels more keenly the embarrassment arising from its irregularities and inconsistencies than does the teacher of speaking deaf children, who realizes afresh daily what...
Page 87 - ... very different and much lighter matter. I cannot speak too strongly upon this point. Would that we had a spelling which made infallible rules possible ! But, as it is, how often does the teacher, baffled by exceptions to the simplest rules he can frame, give up the effort altogether, and fail even to gain for his pupils the benefit of that "half loaf" of the proverb. Because we cannot say of all words similarly spelled that they are pronounced alike, shall we teach the pronunciation of each separately,...
Page 84 - and the diacritical marks of the dictionary. The cause of articulation for the deaf, in this country, owes much to Visible Speech, both from the study of vocal physiology to which it has led, and from the fact that it has offered, through its students, almost the only source of supply for the recent and urgent demand for articulation teachers.
Page 167 - Twenty-five years ago was issued the first German edition of GYMNASTICS OF THE VOICE, which at once became a standard authority,— a position it holds until this day, notwithstanding the many volumes that have appeared and which are — forgotten ! It has been the source from which many subsequent writers have taken ideas and exercises, generally without credit and also without properly and intelligently reproducing them. The repeated editions in Europe, and the necessity of another American edition...
Page 88 - The attempt has been to represent on such a chart just those rules for pronunciation which the elementary language of classes always obliges them to learn as early as possible ; the most nearly invariable and the most frequent in application. And then — 6.
Page 82 - I think, a germ of help for this much-vexed question. To do as he did, in gaining for our children all possible help from simple rules, while teaching, still, that all rules are not final ; to lead them from the first to think and compare and decide ; to introduce them at once to that with which they must eventually deal ; to use reason always rather than memory ; herein lies the secret of the best success. My father's success with his children was rapid and complete. A few months of such instruction...
Page 84 - ... destroyed, but also, most significantly, by the effect of hearing another language for any length of time to the total exclusion of our own. If, therefore, the printed -words he sees can be made to speak to the deaf child by emphasizing...

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