Conventionalism in Ancient American Art

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Printed at the Salem Press, 1887 - Indian art - 1 pages
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Page 181 - STANFORD AUXILIARY LIBRARY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305-6 (415) 723-9201 All books may be recalled after 7...
Page 156 - ... ways by different prehistoric peoples, but it is when this step is taken that the imprint is given to the art of each. Among other ways, this higher expression seems to be shown in the realistic representation of inanimate and animal objects, often of a mythological or historical character. In the course of time, as art attained increased power of expression, it progressed beyond mere realism, and led to the representation of an object by certain conventional characters, without that close adherence...
Page 155 - It also enables us to trace the development of that innate principle of the human mind which among all nations finds its varied expression in ornament and art. There is now sufficient evidence to show that the artistic powers of man, like the languages, were developed in distinct centres, from primitive forms of expression which, necessarily, had principles in common. This will, probably, account for the close resemblances which occur in the early expressions of art in different and widely separated...
Page 156 - Thus it is that we find in the lower stratum of human development many cookingvessels, water-jars, dishes, and other utensils made of clay, that are of the same form and style of ornamentation; but after the particular form of vessel desired was attained, and the early methods of ornament by finger-marks, indentures, scratches, cross-lines, and the imprint of cord or fabric, had been carried to their full extent, one can easily understand that something higher would follow.
Page 156 - ... of human development many cookingvessels, water-jars, dishes, and other utensils made of clay, that are of the same form and style of ornamentation; but after the particular form of vessel desired was attained, and the early methods of ornament by finger-marks, indentures, scratches, cross-lines, and the imprint of cord or fabric, had been carried to their full extent, one can easily understand that something higher would follow. This advanced step is represented in various ways by different...
Page 167 - ... between which are incised lines for the mouth and teeth. In figure 8 a deep notch is cut on the upper part of the foot, defining the mouth of the fish under the raised knob representing the dorsal fin, on each side of which are two slight knobs for pectoral fins. In figure 9 all the parls have becMi eliminated except the dorsal fin, or the round striated knob above the opening in the foot.
Page 156 - ... methods of expression at the same time. As already stated, it is during this stage of the art of a people that a special imprint is given, and the line of development which follows is so marked that the particular art of one centre of development can be traced as it spreads and infringes upon another. While a comparison of these various forms of art expression may not necessarily prove the routes which different peoples have travelled in their migrations, it does indicate their points of contact,...
Page 165 - In tins case the head is expressed by the nose and eyes which are carved in relief upon a triangular piece of clay added to the upper part of the foot. On each side of this piece of clay are the pectoral fins, while the ventral fins are united by a band of chiy crossing the opening in the foot.
Page 156 - ... indentures, scratches, cross-lines, and the imprint of cord or fabric, had been carried to their full extent, one can easily understand that something higher would follow. This advanced step is represented in various ways by different prehistoric peoples, but it is when this step is taken that the imprint is given to the art of each. Among other ways, this higher expression seems to be shown in the realistic representation of inanimate and animal objects, often of a mythological or historical...
Page 158 - The treatment here given to this animal head lias resulted in an unsymmetrical vessel of rude form, not at all pleasing to the eye. An attempt to correct this lack of symmetry is shown in figure 4, in which the ears have been pushed back and the eyes forward, while to offset the nose and mouth on the front, a knob, which we may call a tail, has been placed opposite ; but still we cannot say that the effect la pleasing, for here we observe the absence of the natural relation of parts without compensation...

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