Conversations with the Capeman: The Untold Story of Salvador Agron

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Univ of Wisconsin Press, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 514 pages
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In the neighborhood of Hell’s Kitchen, 1959, a playground confrontation leaves two white youths bludgeoned to death by a gang of Puerto Rican kids. Sixteen-year-old Salvador Agron, who wore a red-lined satin cape, was charged with the murders, though no traces of blood were found on his dagger. At seventeen, Agron was the youngest person ever to be sentenced to death in the electric chair. After nearly two years in the Death House at Sing Sing Prison, a group of prominent citizens, including Eleanor Roosevelt and the governor of Puerto Rico, convinced Governor Rockefeller to commute Agron’s sentence to one of life imprisonment.
In 1973 Richard Jacoby began a voluminous, twelve-year correspondence with Agron. His Conversations with the Capeman is guaranteed to challenge deeply held notions of crime, punishment, and redemption. Salvador Agron was released from prison in 1979 and died in the Bronx in 1986 at the age of forty-two.

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Wonderful book. A life where the darkness brings reality in ones world. A very inspiring and heartfelt story.

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
4
Section 3
5
Section 4
6
Section 5
7
Section 6
27
Section 7
67
Section 8
129
Section 13
257
Section 14
301
Section 15
330
Section 16
360
Section 17
367
Section 18
413
Section 19
461
Section 20
483

Section 9
169
Section 10
181
Section 11
197
Section 12
205
Section 21
497
Section 22
509
Section 23
511
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About the author (2000)

Richard Jacoby, who grew up in the Bronx and Brooklyn, now lives in Santa Monica, California, where he has worked for over twenty years as a special education teacher for profoundly disabled children.

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