Conversations on the mythology of the ancients, or, A history of the heathen deities

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Carlton & Phillips, 1854 - Mythology, Classical
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Page 97 - And sullen Moloch fled, Hath left in shadows dread His burning idol all of blackest hue; In vain with cymbals' ring They call the grisly king, In dismal dance about the furnace blue; The brutish gods of Nile as fast, Isis and Orus, and the dog Anubis, haste.
Page 101 - For my people have committed two evils; they have forsaken me the fountain of living waters, and hewed them out cisterns, broken cisterns, that can hold no water.
Page 84 - And lest thou lift up thine eyes unto heaven, and when thou seest the sun, and the moon, and the stars, even all the host of heaven, shouldest be driven to worship them, and serve them, which the Lord thy God hath divided unto all nations under the whole heaven.
Page 96 - At tables playing Don Gaiferos sits, For Melisendra is forgotten now.2 And that personage who appears there with a crown on his head and a sceptre in his hand...
Page 97 - Typhon huge ending in snaky twine ; Our Babe, to show his Godhead true, Can in his swaddling bands control the damned crew.
Page 93 - They were mounted on swift horses, with drawn swords in their hands; and in the throng of battle selected such as were destined to slaughter, and conducted them to Valhalla, the hall of Odin, or paradise of the brave; where they attended the banquet, and served the departed heroes with horns of mead and ale.
Page 96 - Juggernaut. No record of ancient or modern history can give, I think, an adequate idea of this valley of death ; it may be truly compared with the ' Valley of Hinnom.' The idol called Juggernaut has been considered as the Moloch of the present age ; and he is justly so named, for the sacrifices offered up to him by self-devotement are not less criminal, perhaps not less numerous, than those recorded of the Moloch of Canaan. Two other idols accompany Juggernaut, namely, Boloram and Shubudra, his brother...
Page 14 - Greek legend, a monster with the head of a lion, the body of a goat, and the tail of a dragon.
Page 96 - I have seen Juggernaut. The scene at Buddruck is but the vestibule to Juggernaut. No record of ancient or modern history can give, I think, an adequate idea of this valley of death ; it may be truly compared with the ' Valley of Hinnom.' The idol called Juggernaut has been considered as the Moloch of the present age ; and he is justly so named, for the sacrifices offered up to him by self-devotement are not less criminal, perhaps not less numerous, than those recorded...
Page 52 - ... antidote that Mercury had given him, and then ran into her cave with his sword drawn, and forced her to restore his companions to their former shapes again.

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