Cooking Without Fuss: Stress-Free Recipes for the Home Cook

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Franz Steiner Verlag, Mar 29, 2007 - Cooking - 160 pages

'Cooking Without Fuss' is about bringing people back into the kitchen with thought-provoking and brilliantly simple recipes. Cooking doesn’t have to be stressful, as long as you are organized.

Haughton cooks professionally at The Havelock Tavern – the acclaimed gastro-pub in west London. These quick to prepare and satisfying recipes derive from The Havelock’s menu of Modern British dishes. They include winter-warming dishes such as Pot-roast chicken with Leek and Anchovies, delicious tarts including Crab, Tomato and Saffron and indulgent family puds such as Steamed Pecan and Maple and Norfolk Apple and Treacle Tart. The book also features perfect side dishes including The Havelock’s chips, famed for being the best in London.

The book includes advice on traditional cooking principles, menu balancing and cooking for crowds. It encourages readers to cook with enjoyment and ease.

 

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Contents

Foreword by Simon Hopkinson
6
Here Comes the Sun 20
21
Curries
61
Recommended Suppliers
156
Copyright

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Page 158 - Place the apple, cinnamon stick, brown sugar and 1 litre (4 cups) water in a pan. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 10-15 minutes, or until the flavours have infused and the apples have softened.
Page 158 - Reduce the heat to low and simmer the soup for 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the basil.

About the author (2007)

\Jonny Haughton is head chef and joint owner of The Havelock Tavern, West London. Largely self-taught, he served his apprenticeship with Boyd Gilmour and worked his way around London with jobs at 192, The Nosh Brothers, and Kartouche. Haughton teamed up with Peter Richnell to open The Havelock Tavern in 1996. In 2003, they opened The Earl Spencer, in south west London, which won the Evening Standard Pub of the Year Award 2004.

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