Cool Orchids, and how to Grow Them: With a Descriptive List of All the Best Species in Cultivation

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R. Hardwicke, 1874 - Orchid culture - 160 pages
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Page 49 - Orchid-house, the bottom being covered with a layer of living sphagnum. Then, as back bulbs are cut from the plants, they should be labelled and laid on the moss, which should be watered or syringed occasionally to keep it fresh and moist. Nearly all Orchids will break freely from the old bulbs in a close humid atmosphere, provided always that there are latent buds on the parts removed. Old back bulbs of Oncidiums, Odontoglossums, Zygopetalums, Miltonias, Maxillarias, and Lycastes, may be placed...
Page 53 - Culley, who has charge of tha well known collection of " Cool " Orchids at Ferniehurst, never hesitates to smoke his Odontoglots, but it must be remembered that their bulbs and foliage are fresh and plump, in which condition it rarely harms them, though Mr. Bateman, whose name in connection with Orchids is well-known, strongly objected to the use of tobacco smoke in the Odontoglossum houses. Orchids grown in cool houses rarely suffer from the small white and brown scales which make such sad havoc...
Page 55 - ... soon after it is applied. The following are well-known methods of capturing and destroying insects that infest Orchids generally. For Cockroaches and crickets, place bell glasses, bottles, smooth or glazed pans, so that the sides are in a slanting position, and fill them with treacle and water, in which the insects drown themselves. Woodlice may be destroyed by placing Potatoes cut in halves about the plants, which should be examined every day till they disappear. Green-fly may be killed by smoking,...
Page 55 - ... burning, still only half the quantity must beused, andif a certain weight be not strong enough for a house, it maybe gradually increased. Three smokings on successive nights will kill thrips ; or for either thrips or spiders, if the plants be washed with a mixture of 1 oz. of bitter aloes and 1 oz. of tobacco to a gallon of water, it is safer than mixtures containing soft soap or turpentine, which are apt to burn the plants or spoil the leaves if it gets in the crowns. Tobacco water made from...
Page 55 - They should be washed immediately on its appearance, and the plants examined a time or two about once a week after, and if done as soon as seen, and not allowed to spread, there is little difficulty in keeping them clean. Ants may be destroyed by a few fresh, unpicked bones being placed for them, or sponges wetted and filled with sugar, or treacle in bottles or pans. Slugs may be collected by a little bran placed under some Cabbage leaves, or pieces of bark with the hollow side down, which is also...
Page 43 - ... in some cases even overlapping, and thus effectually preventing the possibility of the pollen being removed by insect or other agency, or becoming damaged by water or other foreign body coming in contact with it. The ovary enlarges rapidly after fertilisation; the capsules of Phalaenopsis, which are rarely half an inch long before that takes place, attain a length of from 4 to 6 inches, and the thickness of the little finger, in about sixty days after that has taken place and contain many hundreds...
Page 49 - THE majority of Orchids are very readily multiplied; still there are some that can only be propagated at long intervals. The value of Orchids does not depend so much on the beauty of the plant or its flowers as it does on the small quantity imported, or the difficulty of its being multiplied in our collections. Dendrobiums are perhaps as easy to propagate as any other Orchids. The old flowering bulbs of D. nobile may be cut into lengths, the latter being inserted in a common cutting pan, covering...
Page 51 - ScMlleriana. disturbed for twelve months at least. Even after the seed does germinate, it takes the seedlings a long time to make flowering plants ; still the raising of seedling Orchids is very interesting for those who have the leisure and. inclination to devote to the subject. Seedling Dendrobes and Cypripediums have been raised at the Fairfteld Nurseries — the latter from imported seed; and Mr.
Page 52 - Calanthes are very easy to propagate, for if an old bulb has its top broken off it will often produce two or three young plants round the fracture. The delicate little...
Page 44 - The great difficulty, however, does not lie in the mere fertilisation, but in obtaining a fair percentage of good seed ; and, as before mentioned, it is requisite for the parent plant to be in the highest state of health, in order to produce seed in good condition. After many careful experiments, I have come to the conclusion that perfect seeds are produced much more rarely than is generally supposed ; indeed, I believe Orchids produce good seed but very seldom, and to this may be attributed the...

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