Coos Texts

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Columbia University Press, 1913 - Coos Indians - 216 pages
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Page 41 - ... things before him. The skychief looked at them, and said, "Indeed, it is so, O cousin! Sit down here, we will gamble." They began to play. The earth-chief thought to himself, "With what shall I point my finger at the player who puts his hand behind his back? Suppose I put a piece of abalone shell into my eye? I will sleep in the inside part of my eye.
Page 192 - ... those followed by S are taken from Von der Schulenburg's Dictionary. References like 212.5 refer to page and line of the present volume ; those preceded by ZE refer to my paper "Eine Sonnensage der Tsimschian" (Zeitschrift fur Ethnologic, 1908, Heft 5, pp. 776-797). References to G refer to the Grammar in the " Handbook of American Indian Languages" (Bulletin 40, Bureau of American Ethnology [1911]).
Page 151 - The man who was building did not come home, and they were looking for him. He lay (got in) in the canoe dead, without a head. The little dog was barking alongside of the canoe. The dog would look upwards every time it barked. Straight up it would look. So thus they began to think: "(Some one) from above must have killed him!" Then the next day his younger brother looked for him. The young man shot an arrow upwards, and would then shoot another one. He was shooting the arrows upwards. Every time he...
Page 37 - Suppose I stop now, I doubt whether any one will eat it." Thus he spoke. People were living down below. "Suppose I go there! No one will eat my food.
Page 39 - THE STEALING OF FIRE AND WATER THE earth was inhabited. All kinds of people (lived) in a mixed-up fashion. They had no fire, nor water. Whenever they intended to eat something, they would put it under their arms, and dance with it. The old people would sit on it; and as soon as it became warm, they would eat it. Whenever salmon came ashore, they would scoop them up. In this manner they had hardly any food. They were talking about the fire. "How would it be if we should go after it?"-"Let us go there!
Page 163 - Her shoulders were turning into tsaLtstL, and (became) black. Again they went back, her husband and child. Afterwards little serpents came in and out to the ocean. And the woman did not come ashore: she was not seen again. The little serpents came after arrows, jumping (over one another). The people shot arrows at them. They were merely giving them arrows. They did not come back again. Afterwards two whales came ashore, — one (in the) summer, and (one) also (in the) winter.

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