Copenhagen

Front Cover
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Aug 4, 2010 - Drama - 144 pages
The Tony Award—winning play that soars at the intersection of science and art, Copenhagen is an explosive re-imagining of the mysterious wartime meeting between two Nobel laureates to discuss the atomic bomb.

In 1941 the German physicist Werner Heisenberg made a clandestine trip to Copenhagen to see his Danish counterpart and friend Niels Bohr. Their work together on quantum mechanics and the uncertainty principle had revolutionized atomic physics. But now the world had changed and the two men were on opposite sides in a world war. Why Heisenberg went to Copenhagen and what he wanted to say to Bohr are questions that have vexed historians ever since. In Michael Frayn’s ambitious, fiercely intelligent, and daring new play Heisenberg and Bohr meet once again to discuss the intricacies of physics and to ponder the metaphysical—the very essence of human motivation.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - setnahkt - LibraryThing

No one from the liberal arts side particularly cared about the “The Two Cultures” until the discovery and application of nuclear fission. It hadn’t started that way; Leonardo Da Vinci and Christopher ... Read full review

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User Review  - sweetiegherkin - LibraryThing

In the afterlife, Werner Heisenberg meets again with his former mentor Niels Bohr and Bohr's wife Margrethe to discuss why the two physicists met in Copenhagen during World War II when they were on ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
2
Section 2
3
Section 3
4
Section 4
7
Section 5
11
Section 6
15
Section 7
22
Section 8
38
Section 12
52
Section 13
54
Section 14
55
Section 15
63
Section 16
66
Section 17
87
Section 18
88
Section 19
95

Section 9
42
Section 10
49
Section 11
50
Section 20
134
Section 21
135
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Michael Frayn has written plays, novels, and screenplays, in additioin to being a journalist, documentary filmmaker, and translator of Chekhov. His thirteen plays include Copenhagen, which was awarded the Tony Award for Best Play, as well as the Outer Critics Circle and Drama Desk awards and, in the United Kingdom, the Olivier and Evening Standard awards. His novel Headlong was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. His most recent novel, Spies, was published in 2002. Born in London in 1933 and educated at Cambridge, Frayn is married to the biographer and critic Claire Tomalin; they live in London.

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