Coping Better with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for CFS/ME

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Karnac Books, 2009 - Health & Fitness - 135 pages
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CFS/ME is a debilitating disorder which affects both physical and psychological functioning. It is also a poorly understood condition which was not widely accepted as a specific disorder until only a few years ago. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT), in conjunction with other physical and medical therapies, is now generally accepted as the treatment of choice for people who are affected by CFS/ME. This book provides the perfect companion for patients to develop and apply new insights into overcoming some of their specific symptoms as well as coping with the syndrome, both during the course of their therapy and afterwards. It provides a helpful structure and framework for understanding CFS/ME and its effects as well as practical exercises to help address some of the symptoms that patients may experience.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
1
Maintaining factors
7
CHAPTER THREE
23
CHAPTER FOUR
31
Circadian rhythms
34
Guide for interpreting your own activity diary
49
CHAPTER EIGHT
65
CHAPTER NINE
79
Stop signals
88
CHAPTER
95
Other ways to identify core beliefs
101
New beliefs
107
What to do if you experience a warning sign
113
Possible contributing factors to a CFSME relapse
120
CHAPTER THIRTEEN
123
Copyright

Techniques for dealing with worry and stress
82

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Dr Bruce Fernie is a chartered counselling psychologist at the Fatigue Service at the Royal Free Hospital. He also works as a psychologist for CASCAID, an HIV mental health service within South London and Maudsley NHS Trust. He has worked in CFS/ME for four years, in which time he has coordinated the development of, and co-facilitated, the evidence-based group programmes designed to help those diagnosed with CFS/ME. As well as CFS/ME, his research interests lie in procrastination, metacognition and Self-Regulatory Executive Function theory.

Dr Gabrielle Murphy is a physician working in the Fatigue Service at the Royal Free Hospital where she is the Clinical Lead. She also works in the Department of HIV medicine. Her interests include medically unexplained symptoms. Gabrielle is actively involved in local and national organisations promoting access to CFS/ME services and ongoing research.

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