Copper Work - A Text Book for Teachers and Students in the Manual Arts ..

Front Cover
Read Books, 2007 - Crafts & Hobbies - 128 pages
PREFACE. this book the subject of Copper Work, as it may be introduced into the public schools, is treated to the extent of specifying an equipment and suggesting some of the possibilities of a course. Not only will there be found an abundance of illustrative material on this subject, con- sisting of drawings and photographs of various objects executed by upper grammar and high school pupils, but also a detailed description of the processes necessary for the execution of many of the designs. It is not expected that the problems as given will be slavishly copied, but rather that they will make clear the methods and processes that may be applied in the working out of similar problems. It is hoped that this volume will be especially helpful to teachers in the Manual Arts who are trying to introduce Metal Work into the regular school course. The author is indebted to Charles J. Martin and Antonio Cirino, for valuable assistance in making some of the illustrations. AUGUSTUS F. ROSE. PLATE 1. Anvils LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 2. Hammers - PLATE. 3. Shears and Flyers 4. Escutcheons--------- 5. Photograph - 6. Hinge Tails - 7- 8. --------- 9. Drawer and Door Pulls - 10. 11. 12. 13. Hinges 14. 15. 16. 17. - - Photograph - 18. Finger Plates - 19. Photographs 20. Pad Corners 21. Box Corners -------- 22. 23. Stamp Boxes - 24. 25. 26. Cover Designs Photograph 27. Match Boxes - - - 28. Cover Designs 29. SconceA - - - 29a. Pattern 30. Desk Set. Photograph - 31. Sconce B 32. Picture Frame - - - LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Continued. PLATE PAGE 33. Picture Frame Designs ------- 62 34. Raised Forms --------- 68 35. Photograph ------ 71 36. Pitchers ---------- 73 37. Tea Set ---------- 76 38. Pupils at Work. Photograph ----- 77 ---------- 39. Porringer 79 40. Handles -------- 80 41. Photograph ------- 82 42. Ink Pot - - - - - 85 43. Photograph-------- 86 - - -------- 44. 88 45. Sealing Wax Set -------- QO 46. Watch Fobs --------- 92 47. Photograph------- 93 48. Spoons ----------- 96 49. Sugar Tongs and Tea Scoops - 97 - - - - - - - - - - - 99 FIGURES. FIGURE LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. Continued. PAGE 13. Draw Pulls - 25 14- 25 i5a. 26 i5b. ---- 26 i5c, d, 26 ...-------- 156. 26 i6a. 27 i6b. 27 i6c. - 27 i6d. 27 i6e. ---------- 27 18. Stamp Box ---------- 43 ---------- 19. 45 20. 21. Chasing. Photograph 22. Hammer - - 45 - - 66 66 23. Hammering. Photograph 69 - - - - - - 24. Raised Bowl, First step 69 25. Surface Plate. Photograph - 72 26. Snarling Iron, - 74 27. in use. - Photograph 75 28. - Soldering Porringer 7g 29. Dapping Tools in use - 30. Drawing Tubing - -.--.. IOo 31. I00 32. Drawing Wire. - Photograph 101 33. Stamp I02 34- - Engraving. Photograph - - - - 105 35- Engraving 84 I07 Chapter I. INTRODUCTION. During the past few years many experiments have been tried in the development of Manual Training Courses and much time has been spent in discussing of what lines of work they should consist. Wood and iron were the first materials used and are yet indispensable, but experience has led those who are developing this work to believe that there are other materials as well adapted to Manual Train- ing work in all its various forms. Clay, used not only for modeling but for ceramic work as well, leather, brass and copper are materials that have also been put to the test and found satisfactory in many ways. In ancient times copper was known as a useful metal, and down through the ages it not only held its own but increased in usefulness. Among its valuable properties may be mentioned toughness and ductility its toughness enables it to be beaten into thin strong sheets, while its ductility enables it to be drawn out into fine wire. Copper readily forms important alloys, such as brass from copper and zinc..

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