Core Topics in Operating Department Practice: Anaesthesia and Critical Care

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Brian Smith, Paul Rawling, Paul Wicker, Chris Jones
Cambridge University Press, Mar 15, 2007 - Medical
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Recent changes in medical roles and responsibilities have raised the profile of Operating Department Practitioners (ODPs). The level of knowledge is vast, and exams must be taken working towards statutory registration. This is the first in a series of three books providing comprehensive information for healthcare staff working in the operating department. Topics covered include anaesthesia, critical care, post-interventional care, enhancing care delivery, professional practice, leadership and resource management. The clear and concise format is ideally suited to study, qualification and for continued reference during practice. Written by specialists with a wealth of knowledge and experience, and incorporating problem-based learning using case studies, this book will be essential reading for ODPs and theatre nurses throughout the UK, in Australia where the same structures have been adopted, and worldwide for all professionals working in operating departments.
 

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Contents

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Figure 135 ABG analysis flow chart
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emphasised The clinical appearance of a patient
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Page 10 - The test is the standard of the ordinary skilled man exercising and professing to have that special skill. A man need not possess the highest expert skill at the risk of being found negligent. It is well established law that it is sufficient if he exercises the ordinary skill of an ordinary competent man exercising that particular art.
Page 10 - You must take reasonable care to avoid acts or omissions which you can reasonably foresee would be likely to injure your neighbour. Who, then, in law is my neighbour? The answer seems to be — persons who are so closely and directly affected by my act that I ought reasonably to have them in contemplation as being so affected when I am directing my mind to the acts or omissions which are called in question.
Page 10 - In particular in cases involving, as they so often do, the weighing of risks against benefits, the judge before accepting a body of opinion as being responsible, reasonable or respectable, will need to be satisfied that, in forming their views, the experts have directed their minds to the question of comparative risks and benefits and have reached a defensible conclusion on the matter...

About the author (2007)

Brian Smith is Senior Lecturer in Continuing Professional Development at Edge Hill College of Higher Education, Liverpool.

Paul Rawling is Recovery Team Leader and Lecturer at the Countess of Chester Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.

Paul Wicker is Head of Operating Department Practice Programmes at Edge Hill College of Higher Education, Liverpool.

Chris Jones is Senior Lecturer in Continuing Professional Development at Edge Hill College of Higher Education, Liverpool.

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