Corn plants: their uses and ways of life

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Houghton, Mifflin and company, 1902 - Gardening - 106 pages
 

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Page x - Moses, Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn.
Page 60 - Go to the ant, thou sluggard ; consider her ways, and be wise: which having no guide, overseer, or ruler, provideth her meat in the summer, and gathereth her food in the harvest.
Page 97 - An iron pot is filled with sand, and set on the fire till the sand is very hot. Two or three pounds of the grain are then thrown in, and well mixed with the sand by stirring. Each grain bursts and throws out a white substance of twice its bigness. The sand is separated by a wire sieve, and returned into the pot to be again heated and repeat the operation with fresh grain.
Page 60 - Go to the ant, thou sluggard; Consider her ways, and be wise: Which having no chief, Overseer, or ruler, Provideth her bread in the summer, And gathereth her food in the harvest.
Page 91 - Indian corn is sown in tilled land it yields with little labour more than twice as much food per acre as any other kind of grain. This was of incalculable advantage to the English settlers of New England, who would have found it much harder to gain a secure foothold upon the soil if they had had to begin by preparing it fcr wheat and rye without the aid of the beautiful and beneficent American plant.
Page 95 - a kind of meale pottage unparched; from this the English call their .samp, which is Indian corn, beaten and boiled and eaten hot or cold, with milke or butter, which are mercies beyond the natives plaine water, and which is a dish exceedingly wholesome for the English bodies.
Page 91 - It could be planted without clearing or plowing the soil. It was only necessary to girdle the trees with a stone hatchet, so as to destroy their leaves and let in the sunshine. A few scratches and digs were made in the ground with a stone digger, and the seed once dropped in took care of itself. The ears could hang for weeks after ripening and could be picked off without meddling with the stalk ; there was no need of threshing or winnowing. None of the Old World cereals can be cultivated without...
Page 97 - ... grain bursts and throws out a white substance of twice its bigness. The sand is separated by a wire sieve, and returned into the pot to be again heated and repeat the operation with fresh grain. That which is parched is pounded to a powder in mortars. This being sifted will keep long for use. An Indian will travel far and subsist long on a small bag of it, taking only six or eight ounces of it per day mixed with water.
Page 27 - ... until it was washed away, so that the roots of the plants growing in it were laid bare. The roots thus exposed in a field of rye, in one of beans, and in a bed of garden peas presented the appearance of a mat or felt of white fibres to a depth of about four feet from the surface of the ground.
Page 95 - I have travelled with near two hundred of them at once, near one hundred miles through the woods, each man carrying a little basket of this at his back, and sometimes in a hollow leather girdle about his middle, sufficient for a man for three or four days.

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