Coroner's Journal: Forensics and the Art of Stalking Death

Front Cover
During Hurricane Katrina, Dr. Louis Cataldie remained in New Orleans in dangerous and often unbearable conditions to attend to the sick, the injured-and the dead. As chief coroner of Baton Rouge, tending to the dead is Cataldie's job. A little town with big-city problems, Baton Rouge means "Red Stick"-and lives up to its bloody name. Cataldie has faced unusual and disturbing cases, from tracking three serial killers on the loose simultaneously while working the scene of a Malvo/ Muhammad Beltway Sniper shooting, to helping apprehend Baton Rouge serial killer Derrick Todd Lee in a controversial case that was featured in an ABC Primetime Live special with Diane Sawyer and Patricia Cornwell.

Cataldie's maverick ways have made him a favorite target of the media, but he offers no apologies, and speaks for those who cannot speak for themselves. Graphic and frank, this is his unique, up-close look at his life spent stalking death in the Deep South.

 

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User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This was a great book about Louisiana and tragedy. Dr Cataldie did a wonderful job telling of deaths by serial killers to death by suicide and everything in between. It's a must read if you love true forensics!!

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Carol420 - LibraryThing

I'm not a real fan of true crime but this book had some really good stories about Dr. Cataldie's personal experiences. Read full review

Contents

Katritta
1
Coroner
21
Forensics 101
41
What Are the Odds?
69
Too Young to Die
91
Head Cases
117
Final Exit
143
Thou Shalt Not Kill
169
Headhunter
199
Monster on the Loose
209
Unsolved Mysteries
245
In the Sights of a Sniper
255
A Killer Strikes Again
271
To Catch a Killer
295
Conclusion
323
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Louis Cataldie was the coroner of East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, from 1998 to 2003. He has been a small-town general practitioner and an emergency room doctor in Baton Rouge, where he now lives. After the catastrophe of Hurricane Katrina, he was named Louisiana State Medical Examiner.

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