Corporate Crime, Law, and Social Control

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 25, 2002 - Law - 180 pages
Why do corporations obey the law? When companies violate the law, what kinds of interventions are most apt to correct their behavior and return them to compliant status? In this book Sally Simpson examines whether the shift towards the use of criminal law, with its emphasis on punishment and stigmatization, is an effective strategy for controlling illegal corporate behavior. She concludes that strict criminalization models will not yield sufficiently high levels of compliance. Empirical data suggest that in most cases cooperative models work best with most corporate offenders. Because some corporate managers, however, respond primarily to instrumental concerns, Simpson argues that compliance should also be buttressed by punitive strategies. Her review and application of the relevant empirical literature on corporate crime and compliance combined with her judicious examination of theory and approaches, make a valuable new contribution to the literature on white-collar crime and deterrence and criminal behavior more generally.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER ONE Criminalizing the Corporate Control Process
1
CHAPTER TWO Deterrence in Review
22
CHAPTER THREE Assessing the Failure of Corporate Deterrence and Criminal Justice
45
CHAPTER FOUR Corporate Deterrence and Civil Justice
61
CHAPTER FIVE Corporate Deterrence and Regulatory Justice
79
Alternatives to Criminalization
98
An Empirical Test
116
CHAPTER EIGHT Shaping the Contours of Control
153
Questionnaire Items and Responses
163
Sample Characteristics
169
Questionnaire Items and Responses
170
Sample Characteristics
173
Name Index
174
Subject Index
176
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