Corporate Governance

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Cavendish Publishing, May 27, 1995 - Business & Economics - 236 pages
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This book critically considers the relationship between directors, shareholders and auditors in the corporate governance system. Traditionally, company law has been primarily based on this tripartite relationship. This book comprises a series of contributions from authors who argue that there are wider interests which British company law has largely ignored. These include the interests of creditors, employees, consumers, suppliers and the general public. The concept of corporate governance is examined with comparative references to the USA and Canada. Particular reference is made to the Cadbury Committee and its implications for future company law reform. The ethical and sociological dimensions of corporate governance is also fully discussed
 

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Contents

Shareholding and the Governance of Public Companies
57
The Role of Exit and Voice in Corporate Governance
75
Creditor Interests and Directors Obligations
111
Corporate Governance Great Expectations
143
Ownership and Accountability in Corporate Governance
161
Towards Some
181
The Role of the NonExecutive Director
199
The Role of the Chairman
213
Developing an Ethical Framework
269
The Role of the Institutional Shareholders Committee
283
Going Concern and Internal Control
337
The Cadbury Committee Report Implementation and Influence
355
Corporate Governance and Corporate Control
361
Sir Adrian Cadbury
391
Bibliography
401
Index
431

Reform of the General Meetings
221
Codes of Conduct and Their Impact on
241

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