Corporate Power and the Environment: The Political Economy of U.S. Environmental Policy

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2001 - Business & Economics - 145 pages
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Environmental policy is broadly viewed as an oasis of democracy, unspoiled by crass capitalism and undominated by corporate interests. This book counters that view. The focus of Corporate Power and the Environment is on how U.S. economic elites--corporate decisionmakers and other individuals of substantial wealth--shape the content and implementation of U.S. environmental policy to their economic and political benefit. The author uses the management of the national forests and national parks, as well as wilderness preservation policies and federal clean air policies, as case studies to show corporate power in action in even the purest of policy arenas. Visit our Web site for sample chapters!
 

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Contents

The Policymaking Process
1
Practical Forestry and the US Forest Service
23
The Political Economy of the National Park System
45
Wilderness Preservation Policy The Cases of Yosemite Park and Jackson Hole
61
Anatomy of a Wilderness Controversy The Creation of Redwood National Park
79
The Legislative Process and the Clean Air Act of 1990
95
Conclusion Political Power and the Environment
115
Bibliography
125
Index
139
About the Author
145
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About the author (2001)

George A. Gonzalez is assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Miami at Coral Gables, and coeditor of Flashpoints in Environmental Policymaking: Controversies in Achieving Sustainability.

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