Corporations: A Study of the Origin and Development of Great Business Combinations and of Their Relation to the Authority of the State

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Beard Books, May 1, 2000 - Business & Economics - 332 pages
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The purpose of this work is to trace the historical development of corporate forms and the social functions that have successively been performed within them. The subject of corporations is divided on the basis of those that have been of service to mankind under conditions prevalent in the past and those at the turn of the twentieth century. Covered are: ecclesiastical corporations; feudalism and corporations; municipalities; gilds; educational and eleemosynary corporations; national England; regulated companies; regulated exclusive companies; joint-stock companies; colonial companies; legal view of corporations; and modern corporations.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
THE NATURE OF CORPORATIONS
13
ECCLESIASTICAL CORPORATIONS I Organic Christianity
35
FEUDALISM AND CORPORATIONS
88
MUNICIPALITIES
92
GILDS
130
EDUCATIONAL AND ELEEMOSYNARY CORPORATIONS
245
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Page 22 - D'Awtry, a member of the same society, living in Broad-street, being two of those Physicians that were presented by the College to the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen of the City of London...
Page 2 - Nearly all enterprises requiring for their successful prosecution large investments of capital are conducted by corporations. They, in fact, embrace every branch of industry, and the wealth that they hold in the United States equals in value four-fifths of the entire property of the country. They carry on business with the citizens of every State as well as with foreign nations, and the litigation arising out of their transactions is enormous, giving rise to even" possible question to which the jurisdiction...
Page 15 - The law therefore has wisely ordained, that the parson, quatenus parson, shall never die, any more than the king : by making him. and his successors a corporation. By which means all the original rights of the parsonage are preserved entire to the successor : for the present incumbent, and his predecessor who lived seven centuries ago, are in law one and the same person ; and what was given to the one was given to the other also.

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