Corpse Had a Familiar Face

Front Cover
Charter Books, Dec 1, 1989 - Crime and criminals - 362 pages
0 Reviews
True-crime is stranger, more compelling than fiction, and Miami has a lot more than its share! Now, Pulitzer Prize-winning Miami Herald reporter Edna buchanan tells it all! Movie rights optioned by Walt Disney Productions. "Buchanan fascinates! . . . Bizarre and memorable".--People.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

The corpse had a familiar face: covering Miami, America's hottest beat

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

For 15 years, this Pulitzer Prize-winning police reporter for the Miami Herald has covered murder and rape, drug deals and robbery, Miami and vice, and she tells her story here. Her prose is spare but ... Read full review

Contents

Two Paterson New Jersey
40
Three Miami Dreams and Legends
56
Four Nobody Loves a Police Reporter
83
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1989)

Edna Buchanan commanded the "Miami Herald" police beat for eighteen years, during which she reported the stories of 3,000 homicides and won scores of awards, including the Pulitzer Prize in 1986 and the 2001 George Polk Award for Career Achievement in Journalism. She attracted international acclaim for her classic true-crime memoirs, "The Corpse Had a Familiar Face" and "Never Let Them See You Cry". Her first novel of suspense, "Nobody Lives Forever", was nominated for an Edgar Award.

Edna brings a dynamic and steamy Miami to vivid life in all of her novels. She feels both the heartbeat and the hot breath of this restless, exotic, and mercurial city. Edna also won the Paul Hansell Award for Distinguished Journalism from the Florida Society of Newspaper Editors, the Florida Bar Association Media Award, the American Bar Association Gavel Award, the David Brinkley Award from Barry University in 1988, the Miami Police Trailblazer Award, and has been honored by the Association of Police Planning, the Miami Fraternal Order of Police, and the Miami Police Department.

In addition to eighteen books, Edna has written numerous short stories, articles, essays, and book reviews. She lives in Miami with one dog, too many cats, a small brown rabbit named Bunjamin and her husband.

Bibliographic information