Corrections: A Text/Reader

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SAGE, Mar 20, 2012 - Social Science - 703 pages
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Corrections: A Text/Reader, Second Edition is designed for undergraduate and/or graduate corrections courses. Organized like a traditional corrections text, it offers brief authored introductions in a mini-chapter format for each key Section, followed by carefully selected and edited original articles by leading scholars. This hybrid format – ensuring coverage of important material while emphasizing the significance of contemporary research - offers an excellent alternative which recognizes the impact and importance of new directions and policy in this field, and how these advances are determined by research.
 

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Contents

The Philosophical and Idealogical Underpinnings of Corrections
1
A History of Corrections
14
Jails and the Inmate Experience
68
Sentencing The Application of Punishment
122
Probation and Community Corrections
159
Prisons and the Inmate Experience
219
Parole and Prisoner Reentry
270
The Corrections Experience for Staff
329
Women and Corrections
482
Minorities and Corrections
523
Juveniles and Corrections
583
Corrections in the 21st Century
624
Glossary
652
References
658
Index
673
About the Authors
703

Legal Issues in Corrections
394
Correctional Programming and Treatment
430

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About the author (2012)

Mary K. Stohr is a Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Washington State University. She received a Ph.D. (1990) in political science, with specializations in public administration and criminal justice, from Washington State University. Professor Stohr has published over 80 academic works in the areas of correctional organizations and operation, correctional personnel, inmate needs and assessment, program evaluation, gender, and victimization. Her books, with others, include The American Prison (with Cullen and Jonson); Corrections: The Essentials (with Walsh); Correctional Assessment, Casework and Counseling (with Walsh); Corrections: A Text Reader (with Walsh and Hemmens); Criminal Justice Management: Theory and Practice in Justice Centered Organizations (with Collins); and The Prison Experience (with Hemmens). She is the Executive Director of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, received the Founders Award from ACJS in 2009, and is a Co-Founder of the Corrections Section of ACJS.

Anthony Walsh, Professor of Criminology at Boise State University, received his Ph.D. from Bowling Green State University at the ripe old age of 43. He has field experience in law enforcement and corrections. He is the author of over 150 journal articles/book chapters and  34 books, including Biology and Criminology (Routledge, 2009), Feminist Criminology Through a Biosocial Lens (Carolina Academic Press, ©2011), Law, Justice, and Society (with Craig Hemmens, Oxford University Press, 2011), Correctional Assessment, Casework, and Counseling (with Mary Stohr, American Correctional Association, 2011), The Neurobiology of Criminal Behavior: Gene-Brain-Culture Interaction (with Jon Bolen, Ashgate, 2012),  Corrections: The Essentials (with Mary Stohr, SAGE, 2012), The Science Wars: The Politics of Gender and Race (Transaction, 2013), Criminological Theory: Assessing Philosophical Assumptions (Anderson/Elsevier, 2014), Biosociology: Bridging the Biology-Sociology Divide (Transaction, 2014), Criminology: The Essentials (Sage, 2015). His interests include the biosocial criminology, statistics, and criminal justice assessment and counseling.

Craig Hemmens is Department Chair and Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Washington State University. In addition to being the editor for the SAGE Text/Reader Series in Criminology/Criminal Justice, he has published several books, including Law, Justice and Society (Oxford University Press, ©2012), Legal Guide for Police (Anderson, ©2011) and An Introduction to Criminal Evidence (Oxford University Press, ©2009). He holds a J.D. from North Carolina Central University School of Law and a Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from Sam Houston State University. He served as the President of the Association of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS) from 2012 to 2013.