Corrugated Iron: Building on the Frontier

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 2007 - Architecture - 223 pages
0 Reviews
Within a few years engineers were putting up warehouses and elegant railway stations of corrugated iron. By the late 1840s entrepreneurial manufacturers were sending out build-it-yourself cottages for gold prospectors in California and Australia. Whole townships complete with churches, sports pavilions, hotels, and meeting halls were soon available from catalogs, to be flat-packed and sent around the world. The First World War brought the development of the shelter known as the Nissen hut, perhaps the most iconic of all corrugated iron buildings and forerunner of the Quonset hut. Today corrugated sheet metal has proved invaluable in relief work and is used so often as roofing in the developing world that it can lay claim to shelter more people from the elements than any other building material. But the big surprise comes as architects around the world rediscover the virtues of this durable, biodegradable, and environmentally sound material, sufficiently versatile to create unique works of architecture and to house thousands in disaster zones. It answers the needs of both high-tech aesthetics and low-tech aspirations for affordability and ease of construction, as demonstrated by such cutting-edge architects as Will Bruder and Lake/Flato Architects in the United States; Glenn Murcutt in Australia; Rem Koolhaas, Nicholas Grimshaw, and Foreign Office Architects in Europe; and Shuhei Endo in Japan. Whether the appeal lies in nostalgia for rain on rusting tin roofs or in the sophistication of contemporary architecture, corrugated iron deserves to be taken seriously. It has a long and fascinating history and a future as bright as its past.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chatham Naval Dockyard Kent England
21
Paddington Station London England
24
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
28
Brown Brothers Iron Store Geelong Victoria Australia
54
Customs House Paita Peru
58
The Real Bodega de la Concha Jerez de la Frontera Spain
61
Pilgrims Rest Mpumalanga South Africa
64
Queenslands railway stations Australia
67
HUTS HANGARS AND HOSPITALS
107
Nissen huts
118
Quonset huts
124
The Cardington hangars England
131
INFORMAL COMMUNITIES AND DISASTER RELIEF
133
CORRUGATED IRON IN CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURE
145
Glenn Murcutt
181
LakeFlato
192

Grytviken whaling station South Georgia
72
CHURCHES CHAPELS AND MISSION HALLS
79
Sight of Eternal Life Church London England
98
St Johns Church Victoria British Columbia Canada
100
The Italian Chapel Lambholm Scotland
104
Shuhei Endo
205
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY
218
PICTURE SOURCES AND CREDITS
219
INDEX
221
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

Adam Mornement is a writer and editor specializing in the history of design and contemporary architecture. His books include Extensions, Treehouses, and No Longer Notorious.

Bibliographic information