Cost of Producing Sugar in the United States, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia and Cuba: Quality of Raw Material; Price of Sugar Beets; Cost of Farm Labor; European War and the Price of Sugar; Russia, the Great Sugar Producing Nation of the Future; Statistical Tables--comparison of Field and Factory Results

Front Cover
1913 - Beet sugar - 56 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 21 - ... decade of the seventies, they were almost stationary during the eighties, and declined from 1892 to 1894, since which time they have steadily tended upward. Farm wages now, compared with wages during the eighties, are about 55 per cent higher; compared with the low year of 1894, wages are now about 67 per cent higher. The current average rate of farm wages in the United States, when board is included, is, by the month, $21.38; by the day, other than harvest, $1.16; at harvest, $1.57. When board...
Page 38 - ... years that it is interesting to observe to just what extent American capital has invested in the Cuban sugar industry. A careful estimate of this investment in mills, lands, railroads, and other equipment devoted exclusively to the industry, but not including mortgages, gives a total of $54,000,000. In this estimate, however, are included a few companies which were organized in the United States and hold charters granted by different states, but whose stock is owned by persons other than Americans....
Page 39 - ... investment amounts to a very small percentage of the whole. The distribution of this total investment through the different Provinces of the island is as follows: Pinar del Rio, $750,000; Habana, $3,000,000; Matanzas, $5,750,000; Santa Clara, $14,500,000; Camaguey, $4,700,000; and in Oriente, $25,300,000. There are in the island at the present time 173 active mills, of which 34 are wholly American owned and 2 partly controlled by American capital. Another interesting fact is that American-owned...
Page 21 - ... $1.87. That American farm labor is paid from four to six times the wages paid to similar labor in Europe is shown in the same report. For example, the average wage of day laborers on the farms in the 16 sugar beet States in 1912 was $2.45 at harvest time and $1.95 at other seasons of the year. From 76 direct reports received from the various beet growing sections it was found that the average daily wage in the beet fields was $2.21, the average daily earnings of piece workers $3.25. In some esses...
Page 38 - The treaty of reciprocity between the United States and the Republic of Cuba, which was negotiated in 1902, allowed a preference of 20 per cent in the duty on Cuban sugar entering the United States. Since that date Cuba has entered upon a period of development that has exceeded the predictions of the most optimistic. Vast new areas of land have been brought under cultivation, new...
Page 39 - ... included a few companies which were organized in the United States and hold charters granted by different States, but whose stock is owned by persons other than Americans. Their investment amounts to a very small percentage of the whole. The distribution of this total investment through the different Provinces of the island is as follows: Pinar del Rio, $750,000; Habana, $3,000,000; Matanzas, $5,750,000; Santa Clara, $14,500,000; Camaguey, $4,700,000; and in Oriente, $25,300,000. There are in...

Bibliographic information