Costume of the Ancients, Volume 1

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Henry G. Bohn, 1841 - Costume - 50 pages
 

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Page x - ... Engravings, containing Representations of Egyptian, Greek, and Roman Habits and Dresses. " The substance of many expensive works, containing all that may be necessary to give to artists, and even to dramatic performers and to others engaged in classical representations, an idea of ancient costumes sufficiently ample to prevent their offending in their performances by gross and obvious blunders.
Page 42 - A sort of loop or bag of folds was made to hang over the sloped drapery in front, and the folds were ample enough in the back to admit of the garment being occasionally drawn over the head, as it was customary to do during religious ceremonies, and also, probably, in rainy weather. "The material of the toga was wool. The colour, in early ages, its own natural yellowish hue. In later periods this seems, however, only to have been retained in the togas of the higher orders ; inferior persons wearing...
Page 40 - From the unsuccessful attempts, however, first of Augustus, and afterwards of Domitian, entirely to abolish a dress which still continued to remind the people more forcibly than was wished of their ancient liberty, it appears that the toga remained the costume of state and representation with the patricians, nay, with the emperors themselves, unto the last days of Rome's undivided splendour; and we may, I think, assert that not until the empire was transferred to Constantinople did the toga become...
Page 23 - ... only reached to the hips, or descended to the ankles. The whole was secured by means of two clasps or buttons, which fastened together the fore and hind part over each shoulder. In later times this bib, from a square piece of stuff doubled, seems to have become a mere single narrow slip, only hanging down a very short way over the breasts; and allowing the girdle, even when fixed as high as possible, to appear underneath.
Page 24 - This peplum was never fastened on by means of clasps or buttons, but only prevented from slipping off through the intricacy of its own involutions. Endless were the combinations which these exhibited; and in nothing do we see more ingenuity exerted, or more fancy displayed, than in the various modes of making the peplum form grand and contrasted draperies. Indeed the different...
Page 38 - ... household articles of furniture found in or represented on Assyrian monuments and remains, show great artistic elaboration and a profusion of highly wrought ornament. The Assyrians were especially skilful in the chasing of metals, and they delighted in reproducing natural objects on their ornaments. The Greeks had couches covered with skins or drapery, on which several persons might lie with their bodies half raised ; these were used at meal times by the men only, women and children sitting on...
Page 45 - ... foment the exuberances of fashion and little taste through which to check its pruriencies, the Romans carried to a great pitch the shapeless extravagance of some parts of their attire, as may be seen in the absurd head-dresses of the busts of Roman matrons, preserved in the Capitol. 82 APPENDIX. " The Romans, like the Greeks, had peculiar dresses appropriated to peculiar offices and dignities. The Flamens, or priests of Jupiter, wore a pointed cap or helmet, called apex, with a ball of cotton...
Page 47 - Asiatics; but to have offered an oblong square, or an oval, or a hexagon, or an octagon. The cavalry alone wore a circular shield, but of small dimensions, called parma.
Page 50 - The lectus cubicularit, or bed, was higher than the couch, but not unlike it. The tables were generally of costly foreign wood resting on frames of carved marble or an ivory column. The curule chairs, or seats of state of the patricians, were wrought in ivory ; and to form an estimate from the number of beautiful utensils in marble and bronze richly chased and inlaid with silver that have been found in the ruins of a comparatively insignificant city, Pompeii, the wealth of the Romans in movable property...
Page 17 - It was only in later times that the covering, as well of the head as of the body, was left to assume a more easy and uncontrolled flow. At first, as appears both from ancient sculpture and paintings, men and women alike wore their hair descending partly before and partly behind in a number of long separate locks, either of a flat and zig-zagged, or of a round and corkscrew shape. A little later it grew the fashion to collect the whole of the hair hanging down the back, by means of a riband, into...

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