Cottage Building in Cob: Pisť, Chalk & Clay

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Office of "Country life", 1919 - Agriculture, Domestic - 125 pages
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Page 46 - ... possession. I will most willingly give whatsoever in your conscience you shall deeme it worth, and if at any time you shall have occasion to use me, you shall find me a thankeful friend to you and yours.
Page 70 - Besides the advantages of strength and cheapness, this method of building possesses that of speed in the execution. That the reader may know the time that is required for building a house, or an enclosure, he need only be told that a mason used to the work can, with the help of his labourer, when the earth lies near, build in one day 6 ft. square of the piseV
Page 25 - Have we not in Africa and in Spain walls of earth, known as 'formacean' walls? From the fact that they are moulded, rather than built, by enclosing earth within a frame of boards, constructed on either side. These walls will last for centuries, are proof against rain, wind and fire, and are superior in solidity to any cement. Even at this day Spain still holds watch-towers that were erected by Hannibal.. " — (Pliny's "Natural History
Page 72 - ... ft. high above the surface of the ground, planks are arranged on each side, which are filled with earth intended for the wall ; this is called Pis6 in the dialect of the country. It is strongly beaten ; and this method is continued successively all round the building. The walls have more or less thickness according to the fancy of the owner ; I have seen them 6 in. and 18 in. thick. If several stories are intended in such erections, they do not fail to place beams to support the floors before...
Page 64 - ... may be executed in that village. One may also discover the fitness of the soil by trying to break with one's fingers the little clods of earth in the roads, and finding a difficulty in doing it ; or by observing the ruts of the road, in which the cart-wheels make a sort of pise...
Page 57 - Lyons, though little known in the rest of France, or in any other part of Europe. It appeared to be attended with so many advantages, that many gentlemen in this country who employ their leisure in the study of rural economy were induced to make a trial of its efficiency ; and the...
Page 63 - ... lies in clods or lumps; when field-mice have made themselves subterraneous passages in the earth ; all these are favourable signs. When the roads of a village, having been worn away by the water continually running...
Page 70 - The wall surface having been duly hammer-chipped, the work must be scoured with a stiff brush to remove all loose earth and dust, and to finally prepare it for rough-casting. Rough-cast consists of a small quantity of mortar, diluted with water in a tub, to which a trowel of pure lime is added, so as to make it about the thickness of cream ^ One workman and his labourers are sufficient ; the workman on the scaffold sprinkles with *a brush the wall...
Page 71 - A house for a single family is generally finished in about a fortnight. The following is the method I have seen them practise." Building Procedure. — " The earth is pounded as much as possible, in order to crumble any stones therein ; clay is added thereto in a small quantity, about one-eighth part. It is all beaten and mixed up together by repeated blows with a mallet about 10 in. broad, and 10 or 15 in. long, and 2 in. thick. The earth being thus prepared, and slightly wetted, the foundation...
Page 81 - This statement may be questioned by some whose knowledge of pise" is limited to buildings so badly planned that the very elementary principles of building construction have been neglected. This neglect, which is all too common, makes things bad enough, but when to it is added, as is sometimes the case, indifferent workmanship, combined with the use of unsuitable material, the result does not call for admiration, and it is not surprising that a bad impression is created. With no other knowledge of...

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