Country Music Annual 2002

Front Cover
University Press of Kentucky - Performing Arts
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Belligerent and evasive, Josef von Sternberg chose to ignore his illegitimate birth in Austria, deprived New York childhood, abusive father, and lack of education. The director who strutted onto the set in a turban, riding breeches, or a silk robe embraced his new persona as a world traveller, collected modern art, drove a Rolls Royce, and earned three times as much as the president. Von Sternberg traces the choices that carried the unique director from poverty in Vienna to power in Hollywood, including his eventual ostracism in Japan. Historian John Baxter reveals an artist few people knew: the aesthete who transformed Marlene Dietrich into an international star whose ambivalent sexuality and contradictory allure on-screen reflected an off-screen romance with the director. In his classic films The Blue Angel (1930), Morocco (1930), and Blonde Venus (1932), von Sternberg showcased his trademark visual style and revolutionary representations of sexuality. Drawing on firsthand conversations with von Sternberg and his son, Von Sternberg breaks past the classic Hollywood caricature to demystify and humanize this legendary director.
 

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Contents

THE MAN AND HIS IMAGE
3
JOURNALISM ASSISTING SCHOLARSHIP
15
ANTECEDENTS AND TRADITION
26
CLASS CULTURE AND EARLY RADIO MARKETING STRATEGY OF THE COUNTRY MUSIC ASSOCIATION
54
TEX MORTON AND HIS INFLUENCE ON COUNTRY MUSIC IN AUSTRALIA DURING THE 1930s AND 1940s
82
COUNTRY MUSIC PUBLISHING CATALOG ACQUISITION
104
POSTCARDS AND THE PROMOTION OF EARLY COUNTRY MUSIC ARTISTS
117
A SUBCULTURAL ANALYSIS
130
THE VOICE OF THE BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS
151
POLITICS AND COUNTRY MUSIC 19631974
161
OKLAHOMA DIVAS IN AMERICAN COUNTRY MUSIC
186
FIELD RECORDINGS OF EARLY COUNTRY MUSIC
202
CONTRIBUTORS
223
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Page 26 - I've seen trouble all of my days; I'll bid farewell to old Kentucky, The place where I was born and raised.

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