Country Life: A Handbook of Agriculture, Horticulture, and Landscape Gardening

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Dinsmoor, 1866 - Agriculture - 912 pages
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Page 334 - That hangs his head, and a' that ? The coward-slave, we pass him by, We dare be poor for a' that ! For a' that, and a' that, Our toils obscure, and a' that ; The rank is but the guinea stamp ; The man's the gowd for a
Page 424 - what is sauce for the goose, is sauce for the gander...
Page 51 - His thermometers were sunk in the soil only to the depth of -f^ of an inch. In that sunny clime he found the mean heat of soil, at that depth, to be at noon, for six successive months, 131. If that were his mean heat for six months, we cannot doubt that it is frequently obtained as an extreme heat in the hottest portion of our year in England.
Page 503 - Ibs. of hay, or 200 cwt. of beet-root, which are the yearly produce of such a field ; but it is less than the straw, roots, and grain of corn, which might grow on the same surface, would contain...
Page 447 - ... seed, or manure. Thorough draining not only diminishes the cost of ploughing, but it renders it possible to grow great crops of roots — of mangold-wurzel from thirty to thirty-five tons an acre, and of turnips from twenty to twenty-five tons. Ten times more live stock is thus fed on the land than it maintained before. The corn crop follows the roots in due course without further manuring, and is made certain in addition, even in wet seasons. The well-shaped modern plough saves in...
Page 49 - Ib. of water by filtration, no effect is produced beyond what is due to the relative temperatures of the rain and of the soil. Mr. Dickenson, the eminent paper-maker, who has several mills and a considerable landed estate in Hertfordshire, has deduced from a series of observations, which are we believe entitled to great confidence, that of an annual fall of '26 in.
Page 448 - The whole live stock consisted of 200 sheep, and 40 cattle of the old Norfolk breed. He adopted what was then the new, now the old, and what is...
Page 49 - The proportions in which each of these means will operate will vary in every case, but this will be an universal feature, that these 11 inches will maintain in undrained retentive soils, at all except some accidental periods of excessive drought, a permanent supply of water of drainage, which will be in constant course of evaporation, and will constantly produce the cold consequent thereon. Retentive soils never can be so warm as porous, for a simple reason. Every one knows, or may know, that if...
Page 50 - To ascertain the mean heat of the air at the surface of the earth over any extended space, and for a period of eight or nine months, is no simple operation. More elements enter into such a calculation than we have space or ability to enumerate ; but we know certainly that, for seven months in the year, air, at the surface of the ground, is seldom lower than 48, never much lower, and only for short periods ; whereas, at...

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