Course in Modern Production Methods ...

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Business training corporation, 1918 - Factory management
 

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Page 139 - This textbook may be borrowed for two weeks, with the privilege of renewing it once. A fine of five cents a day is incurred by failure to return a book on the date when it is due. The Education Library is open from 9 to 5 daily except Saturday when it closes at 12.30.
Page 108 - Company is as follows: 1. RESPIRATORS must always be worn where there is dust. KEEP THEM CLEAN. Shave frequently so that respirator fits snugly. 2. WASHING. Before eating and before leaving factory at night, employees must thoroughly scrub their hands, clean their finger nails, and brush their teeth. 3. CLOTHES. Employees must make a complete change of clothing, including hat and shoes, upon coming to work and again at the close of the day's work. WORKING-CLOTHES MCTST NOT BE WORN OUTSIDE THE FACTORY...
Page 108 - ... 3. CLOTHES. Employees must make a complete change of clothing, including hat and shoes, upon coming to work and again at the close of the day's work. WORKING-CLOTHES MUST NOT BE WORN OUTSIDE THE FACTORY GROUNDS. 4. BATHS shall be taken daily (on Company's time) before changing into street-clothes. 5. COMPLAINTS. The company furnishes, free of charge, respirators, sponges, tooth and nail brushes, soap, towels, and individual lockers, and has equipped the Plant with bathing facilities and sanitary...
Page 108 - To enforce the application of this preventive work placards are posted throughout the factory: 1. Respirators must always be worn where there is dust. KEEP THEM CLEAN. Shave frequently so that respirator fits snugly. 2. Washing. Before eating and before leaving factory at night employees must thoroughly scrub their hands, clean their fingernails, and brush their teeth.
Page 59 - ... labor requirements, the result will soon be the same. Extra men must be called in, only to be discharged later on. Even though a good man will be needed next week he is laid off as soon as he is through, because foremen are expected to keep down direct labor cost. One Detroit employment manager told me that his foremen were astonished when he analyzed their labor requisitions, showing them how frequently they discharged and then wildly besought men on high-priced operations. Of course, lack of...
Page 68 - Do you want a job?" The answer was "yes," and an inquiry as to the kind of work. This was answered in a monosyllable, and then the applicant asked what the job paid. With no attempt to explain the method of remuneration the applicant was informed that we started men in and they could make fifteen cents an hour but would soon learn and get more money. The applicant said, " I could not work for fifteen cents an hour." The foreman snarled, "Hell! You don't want work," and left the applicant standing...
Page 118 - ... victor. The theory was therefore that to be victorious one must have numbers, better armament, bases of supplies, the advantage of terrain. The armies of the Revolution, Napoleon in particular, later answered: We are not more numerous, we are not better armed, but we shall beat you because by our planning we shall have greater numbers at the decisive point; by our energy, our knowledge, our use of weapons we shall succeed in raising our morale and in breaking down yours.
Page 68 - When the foreman appeared on the scene, after the man had been waiting almost an hour, he approached him with a belligerent attitude, with — "Do you want a job?" The answer was "yes," and an inquiry as to the kind of work. This was answered in a monosyllable, and then the applicant asked what the job paid. With no attempt to explain the method of remuneration the applicant was informed that we started men in and they could make 15 cents an hour but would soon learn and get more money.
Page 68 - ... heard one of our foremen interview an applicant one day when our need for men was urgent, and the way he handled him opened our eyes as to the possibilities for evil under such a system. We had at that time, when labor was plentiful, a scheme of partial remuneration, different from that outlined above. When the foreman appeared on the scene, after the man had been waiting almost an hour, he approached him in a belligerent attitude, with — "Do you want a job?
Page 68 - I could not work for fifteen cents an hour." The foreman snarled, "Hell! You don't want work," and left the applicant standing in the hallway, with a blank look on his face. At about the same period we advertised for men, and our office was filled daily in the early morning, and when the foremen had grabbed off as many as they needed in point of numbers, they paid no attention to the balance, but would instruct an office boy to tell the applicant that all jobs were filled. One day we received a...

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