Court Reform and Judicial Leadership: Judge George Nicola and the New Jersey Justice System

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1995 - Law - 212 pages
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This study examines judicial leadership in court reform, tying biography, political science, social psychology, law, and history into court reform at the local level through the case of a nationally known jurist and reformer-Judge George Nicola of New Jersey. The work provides an important examination, in depth and over time, of true leadership in the courts and of the exceptionally innovative programs developed by Judge Nicola. The author also addresses two fundamental issues which lie at the heart of court reform and judicial leadership: the perplexing question of whether a judicial system so bound by tradition as that of the United States can be changed from within; and whether judicial leadership provides the best and most fruitful opportunity for changing this institution. This volume will be of interest to scholars of political science, American government, the judiciary, and the practice of law.

 

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Contents

Judicial Leadership and the Perils of Reform
13
The Judge His Background and Philosophy
41
The Juvenile Court Years
63
Managing People and Dockets
91
The Art of Judging
121
The Drug Court
145
Conclusions and Recommendations
171
Selected Bibliography
203
Index
207
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Page 13 - If you will read Pound's speech, you will see at once that we did not heed his warning, and today, in the final third of this century, we are still trying to operate the courts with fundamentally the same basic methods, the same procedures and the same machinery he said were not good enough in 1906. In the supermarket age we are trying to operate the courts with crackerbarrel corner grocer methods and equipment— vintage 1900.
Page 13 - He said then that the work of the courts in the 20th Century could not be carried on with the methods and machinery of the 19th Century. If you will read Pound's speech, you will see at once that we did not heed his warning, and today, in the final third of this century, we are still trying to operate the courts with fundamentally the same basic methods...

About the author (1995)

PAUL B. WICE is Professor of Political Science at Drew University in New Jersey. He is the author of seven books including Judges and Lawyers: The Human Side of Justice (1991), Chaos in the Courthouse (1985), and Participants in American Criminal Justice (1982) with C. Bartollas and S. Miller.

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